History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 62
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<​May 27​> At 4½ P. M, we started on our return; but when we had got as far as brother ’s, a heavy shower of rain commenced, and I went into the house, while most of the brethren went into the barn until the shower abated. After the storm had subsided we went forward, and I, , and some others, arrived at home about 9 P. M, and found sick. My carriage, with , arrived a little after; it was upset on the Temple Hill, but no one hurt. I rode on horseback all the way on “Joe Duncan.”
As we left the Tavern in , and passed the Court House, there were many people about in small groups; stood on the green with one or two men some distance off.
While at Hamilton’s, offered some insulting language concerning me to , who resented it nobly as a friend ought to do; seeing it, turned out of doors.
It was afterwards reported to me by James Flack, that , , Wm. H. Rollison, and the Higbees, were on the hill when I passed in the morning; they immediately gathered their pistols, mounted their horses, and were in before me; excepting .
Also Mr. Powers was talking with Mr. Davis, Tailor, about my going to , and said they would attempt to kill Joseph Smith. Mr. Davis replied, “O no, I think not.” Mr. Powers rejoined, “they will by God, and you know it by God”.
Samuel Smith of Montebello, heard at 5 this morn[HC 6:414]ing, that I had been taken prisoner to by a mob; he immediately gathered a company of 25 men for the purpose of assisting me, and arrived at about the time I did. [HC 6:415]
28 May 1844 • Tuesday
<​28​> Tuesday 28 At home all day. Rain in the afternoon. The “Maid of Iowa” started for the Iowa river at 11 A. M.
I received a letter from Mr. J. Bronder, dated , May 20th., expressing his strong desires that I should allow my name to stand as candidate for the Presidency of the , urging many reasons for his request.
29 May 1844 • Wednesday
<​29​> Wednesday 29 At home. Rain in the morning. , of , Iowa came in, and arrested on a warrant issued by , Judge of the Circuit Court. During our conversation in the afternoon, we learned to our mutual joy that <​ and I​> were of one origin.
Received the following letter:—
“Baltimore, May 9th., 1844.
“Dear Brother Joseph,
From the time of my departure to that of my arrival here on Saturday last, I was blessed with prosperity. The feelings manifested by the passengers on the boat to were quite favorable. At I embarked on board the Steamer ‘Valley Forge’ with about 125 cabin passengers. I gradually introduced myself to those whose faces gave indications of honest hearts and intelligent minds. On Sunday I was invited to give, in a public discourse, the points of difference between the faith of the Latter Day Saints, and other professors of [HC 6:416] the Christian religion. There was a Methodist preacher on board, with whom arrangements were made to follow me, and blow Mormonism to the four winds. Well, I led off in a discourse of an hour and a half. After dinner the Methodists tried to rally their preacher, but he could not be induced to undertake the fulfilment of his engagements. I spent the time in conversing with groups of enquirers, [p. 62]
May 27 At 4½ P. M, we started on our return; but when we had got as far as brother ’s, a heavy shower of rain commenced, and I went into the house, while most of the brethren went into the barn until the shower abated. After the storm had subsided we went forward, and I, , and some others, arrived at home about 9 P. M, and found sick. My carriage, with , arrived a little after; it was upset on the Temple Hill, but no one hurt. I rode on horseback all the way on “Joe Duncan.”
As we left the Tavern in , and passed the Court House, there were many people about in small groups; stood on the green with one or two men some distance off.
While at Hamilton’s, offered some insulting language concerning me to , who resented it nobly as a friend ought to do; seeing it, turned out of doors.
It was afterwards reported to me by James Flack, that , , Wm. H. Rollison, and the Higbees, were on the hill when I passed in the morning; they immediately gathered their pistols, mounted their horses, and were in before me; excepting .
Also Mr. Powers was talking with Mr. Davis, Tailor, about my going to , and said they would attempt to kill Joseph Smith. Mr. Davis replied, “O no, I think not.” Mr. Powers rejoined, “they will by God, and you know it by God”.
Samuel Smith of Montebello, heard at 5 this morn[HC 6:414]ing, that I had been taken prisoner to by a mob; he immediately gathered a company of 25 men for the purpose of assisting me, and arrived at about the time I did. [HC 6:415]
28 May 1844 • Tuesday
28 Tuesday 28 At home all day. Rain in the afternoon. The “Maid of Iowa” started for the Iowa river at 11 A. M.
I received a letter from Mr. J. Bronder, dated , May 20th., expressing his strong desires that I should allow my name to stand as candidate for the Presidency of the , urging many reasons for his request.
29 May 1844 • Wednesday
29 Wednesday 29 At home. Rain in the morning. , of , Iowa came in, and arrested on a warrant issued by , Judge of the Circuit Court. During our conversation in the afternoon, we learned to our mutual joy that and I were of one origin.
Received the following letter:—
“Baltimore, May 9th., 1844.
“Dear Brother Joseph,
From the time of my departure to that of my arrival here on Saturday last, I was blessed with prosperity. The feelings manifested by the passengers on the boat to were quite favorable. At I embarked on board the Steamer ‘Valley Forge’ with about 125 cabin passengers. I gradually introduced myself to those whose faces gave indications of honest hearts and intelligent minds. On Sunday I was invited to give, in a public discourse, the points of difference between the faith of the Latter Day Saints, and other professors of [HC 6:416] the Christian religion. There was a Methodist preacher on board, with whom arrangements were made to follow me, and blow Mormonism to the four winds. Well, I led off in a discourse of an hour and a half. After dinner the Methodists tried to rally their preacher, but he could not be induced to undertake the fulfilment of his engagements. I spent the time in conversing with groups of enquirers, [p. 62]
Page 62