History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 63
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<​May 29​> and giving further information to those who sought it. After tea, the Methodist priest was, by much persuasion, induced to preach; but, to the astonishment of all, he never once mentioned Mormonism. By the by<​e​> we had a beautiful specimen of treatment to the saints on board; while I was speaking, I referred to the <​many​> false statements which found their way to the public through the papers; a case in point was that of Joseph Smith having just discarded his wife. After I had finished speaking, and was standing on the guard of the Boat, a Missourian stepped up to me asking me if I wished to be understood that all who said Jo Smith had discarded his wife were liars . On my answering him in the affirmative, he drew his bowie knife on me; but some passengers, who had heard him threaten my life were watching, and caught him as he was in the act of striking, and I in the act of pitching him overboard; but they saved him, and I am glad of it. The whole affair turned much to my advantage; it was an occular demonstration to the crowd, of Missourians’ feeling towards the Church of Christ.
“By this time the way was pretty well paved for introducing national matters, and from this on to our arrival at Wheeling, the time was principally occupied on that subject, reading your views on political economy &c. On arriving at Wheeling, a stranger might have imagined me to be a man of some consequence; for it was ‘will you take a seat in our coach?’ ‘Go with us in this stage’; ‘hold on and take a seat with us’, says the third. In fact the Mormon was quite a lion among the passengers. But passing the minutiae, I arrived in this city two days after the great Whig Convention. All is joy and enthusiasm among the Whigs, while doubt and consternation is manifest among the democrats. This Convention has been got up at an immense expense— hundreds of thousands of dollars have been expended. The Democratic Convntion comes off on the 27th. inst; in the mean time I shall do what is in my power for the promotion of the good cause, and endeavor to be well accoutred for that occasion. I expect to co-operate with , , and , though as yet I have not heard from them. [HC 6:417]
“I shall expect to receive from you the proceedings of the Convention held at on Monday last, together with such instructions as you may deem proper to give.
.”
30 May 1844 • Thursday
<​30​> Thursday 30 Municipal Court met at 10 A. M., over which I presided <​as Mayor and Chief Justice​>. Present , , , , and , Alderman Associate Justices. was brought up on Habeas Corpus, from the custody of the complainant.
being called by the Court answered that he did not acknowledge the jurisdiction of this court; that his writ was only to keep until he could get another writ for him; that had a writ from , and he considered his prisoner, and he attended this Court as a matter of courtesy, and if any one offered resistance he was instructed by government to give their names &c; and wrote the names of the Court &c.
’s Counsel replied to such a subterfuge writ.
The Court thought it due the Court to hear the reasons why the jurisdiction of the Court was not regarded.
said he did not come to make a speech, but was instructed to arrest the man. He intended to make no defence; he was an Agent of the . “Your writ of Habeas Corpus has nothing more to do with this case than a man [p. 63]
May 29 and giving further information to those who sought it. After tea, the Methodist priest was, by much persuasion, induced to preach; but, to the astonishment of all, he never once mentioned Mormonism. By the bye we had a beautiful specimen of treatment to the saints on board; while I was speaking, I referred to the many false statements which found their way to the public through the papers; a case in point was that of Joseph Smith having just discarded his wife. After I had finished speaking, and was standing on the guard of the Boat, a Missourian stepped up to me asking me if I wished to be understood that all who said Jo Smith had discarded his wife were liars . On my answering him in the affirmative, he drew his bowie knife on me; but some passengers, who had heard him threaten my life were watching, and caught him as he was in the act of striking, and I in the act of pitching him overboard; but they saved him, and I am glad of it. The whole affair turned much to my advantage; it was an occular demonstration to the crowd, of Missourians’ feeling towards the Church of Christ.
“By this time the way was pretty well paved for introducing national matters, and from this on to our arrival at Wheeling, the time was principally occupied on that subject, reading your views on political economy &c. On arriving at Wheeling, a stranger might have imagined me to be a man of some consequence; for it was ‘will you take a seat in our coach?’ ‘Go with us in this stage’; ‘hold on and take a seat with us’, says the third. In fact the Mormon was quite a lion among the passengers. But passing the minutiae, I arrived in this city two days after the great Whig Convention. All is joy and enthusiasm among the Whigs, while doubt and consternation is manifest among the democrats. This Convention has been got up at an immense expense— hundreds of thousands of dollars have been expended. The Democratic Convntion comes off on the 27th. inst; in the mean time I shall do what is in my power for the promotion of the good cause, and endeavor to be well accoutred for that occasion. I expect to co-operate with , , and , though as yet I have not heard from them. [HC 6:417]
“I shall expect to receive from you the proceedings of the Convention held at on Monday last, together with such instructions as you may deem proper to give.
.”
30 May 1844 • Thursday
30 Thursday 30 Municipal Court met at 10 A. M., over which I presided as Mayor and Chief Justice. Present , , , , and , Alderman Associate Justices. was brought up on Habeas Corpus, from the custody of the complainant.
being called by the Court answered that he did not acknowledge the jurisdiction of this court; that his writ was only to keep until he could get another writ for him; that had a writ from , and he considered his prisoner, and he attended this Court as a matter of courtesy, and if any one offered resistance he was instructed by government to give their names &c; and wrote the names of the Court &c.
’s Counsel replied to such a subterfuge writ.
The Court thought it due the Court to hear the reasons why the jurisdiction of the Court was not regarded.
said he did not come to make a speech, but was instructed to arrest the man. He intended to make no defence; he was an Agent of the . “Your writ of Habeas Corpus has nothing more to do with this case than a man [p. 63]
Page 63