History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 271
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<​July 15​> individuals, and to call upon the Lord with the spirit of grace and supplication; and wait patiently on him, until he shall direct our way.
“Let no vain and foolish plans, or imaginations scatter us abroad, and divide us asunder as a people, to seek to save our lives at the expense of truth and principle, but rather let us live or die together and in the enjoyment of society and union. Therefore, we say, let us haste to fulfil the commandments which God has already given us. Yea, let us haste to build the of our God, and to gather together thereunto, our silver and our gold with us, unto the name of the Lord; and then we may expect that he will teach us of his ways and we will walk in his paths.
“We would further say, that in consequence of the great rains which have deluged the western country, and also in consequence of persecution and excitement, there has been but little done here, either in farming or building this season; therefore there is but <​little employment & but​> little means of subsistence at the command of the saints in this region— therefore, let the Saints abroad, and others who feel for our calamities and wish to sustain us, come on with their money and means without delay, and purchase lots and farms, and build buildings, and employ hands, as well as to pay their tithings into the , and their donations to the poor.
“We wish it distinctly understood abroad, that we greatly need the assistance of every lover of humanity whether members of the church or otherwise, both in influence and in contributions for our aid, succor, and support. Therefore, if they feel for us, now is the time to show their liberality and patriotism towards a poor and persecuted, but honest and industrious people.
“Let the elders who remain abroad, continue to preach the gospel in its purity and fulness, and to bear testimony of the truth of these things which have been revealed for the salvation of this generation.
.
.
.
.”
, July 15. 1844.” [HC 7:190]
Elder returned to — two weeks since he left , and reported that all was quiet and peace in the since the burial of the martyrs.
“A Lamentation of a Jew -[]- among the afflicted and mourning sons and daughters of Zion, at the assassination of the two chieftains in Israel, Joseph and ,” was published in the Times and Seasons. [HC 7:191]
16 July 1844 • Tuesday
<​16​> Tuesday 16. finished measuring the last raft of lumber for the , from the — amounting to 87,732 feet.
The following was received by Dr :—
“De Kalb Hancock Co. Ills July 1. 1844
, Dear Sir— In confidence.
I hope the subject upon which this communication [HC 7:192] is written will be sufficient apology for the privilege I have taken in addressing you, with whom I have not had the pleasure of an acquaintance. I wish to apprize you that reports are in circulation, which [p. 271]
July 15 individuals, and to call upon the Lord with the spirit of grace and supplication; and wait patiently on him, until he shall direct our way.
“Let no vain and foolish plans, or imaginations scatter us abroad, and divide us asunder as a people, to seek to save our lives at the expense of truth and principle, but rather let us live or die together and in the enjoyment of society and union. Therefore, we say, let us haste to fulfil the commandments which God has already given us. Yea, let us haste to build the of our God, and to gather together thereunto, our silver and our gold with us, unto the name of the Lord; and then we may expect that he will teach us of his ways and we will walk in his paths.
“We would further say, that in consequence of the great rains which have deluged the western country, and also in consequence of persecution and excitement, there has been but little done here, either in farming or building this season; therefore there is but little employment & but little means of subsistence at the command of the saints in this region— therefore, let the Saints abroad, and others who feel for our calamities and wish to sustain us, come on with their money and means without delay, and purchase lots and farms, and build buildings, and employ hands, as well as to pay their tithings into the , and their donations to the poor.
“We wish it distinctly understood abroad, that we greatly need the assistance of every lover of humanity whether members of the church or otherwise, both in influence and in contributions for our aid, succor, and support. Therefore, if they feel for us, now is the time to show their liberality and patriotism towards a poor and persecuted, but honest and industrious people.
“Let the elders who remain abroad, continue to preach the gospel in its purity and fulness, and to bear testimony of the truth of these things which have been revealed for the salvation of this generation.
.
.
.
.”
, July 15. 1844.” [HC 7:190]
Elder returned to — two weeks since he left , and reported that all was quiet and peace in the since the burial of the martyrs.
“A Lamentation of a Jew -[]- among the afflicted and mourning sons and daughters of Zion, at the assassination of the two chieftains in Israel, Joseph and ,” was published in the Times and Seasons. [HC 7:191]
16 July 1844 • Tuesday
16 Tuesday 16. finished measuring the last raft of lumber for the , from the — amounting to 87,732 feet.
The following was received by Dr :—
“De Kalb Hancock Co. Ills July 1. 1844
, Dear Sir— In confidence.
I hope the subject upon which this communication [HC 7:192] is written will be sufficient apology for the privilege I have taken in addressing you, with whom I have not had the pleasure of an acquaintance. I wish to apprize you that reports are in circulation, which [p. 271]
Page 271