History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 239
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<​June 29​> principle that had it not been for me in September last, Worrell and McBradney would not have been killed; and the city of burned to the ground. They want to hold me responsible for every thing that was done to put them down in their mob doings last year.
“In reference to my correspondence with the , I will say that I received but two letters from him during the difficulty, neither of which were received until after the arrival of and the government troops. In my communications to , in relation to the riots in , I made but one request of him, and that was, that no troops ought to be brought into ; that I had sufficient power with the limits of the county to suppress any further riots, and prevent any more burning. I am certain that the letters which I received from the were either left in your hands, or in the hands of some one in your office at ; at least I have not got them now. I recollect that you desired to get them for future use, and am sorry that I cannot forward them to you. You will find in my proclamations the historical part of the last mob war in .”
The following list is from the pen of Dr :— [HC 7:145]
S[amuel] M. Marr
The foregoing have been aided and abetted by:—
and family
P. T. Rolfe
N. <​W.​> J. Hughes <​Higbee​> <​W[illiam] J Higbee​>
William Cook and Sarah his wife, formerly Sarah Crooks of Manchester.”
30 June 1844 • Sunday
<​30​> Sunday 30. The wrote to , as follows:—
“Head Quarters,
June 30th 1844
,
It is my present opinion that the Mormons will not commit any out break, and that no further alarm need be apprehended. I regret to learn that the party in who are in favor of violent measures have circulated a thousand false rumors of danger, for the purpose of getting men together without my authority, hoping that when assembled, they may be ready to join in their violent councils. This is a fraud upon the country, and must not be endured.
“I am afraid that the people of are fast depriving themselves of the sympathy of their fellow citizens, and of the world. I strictly order and enjoin on you that you permit no attack on , or any of the people there without my authority. I think it would be best to disband your [p. 239]
June 29 principle that had it not been for me in September last, Worrell and McBradney would not have been killed; and the city of burned to the ground. They want to hold me responsible for every thing that was done to put them down in their mob doings last year.
“In reference to my correspondence with the , I will say that I received but two letters from him during the difficulty, neither of which were received until after the arrival of and the government troops. In my communications to , in relation to the riots in , I made but one request of him, and that was, that no troops ought to be brought into ; that I had sufficient power with the limits of the county to suppress any further riots, and prevent any more burning. I am certain that the letters which I received from the were either left in your hands, or in the hands of some one in your office at ; at least I have not got them now. I recollect that you desired to get them for future use, and am sorry that I cannot forward them to you. You will find in my proclamations the historical part of the last mob war in .”
The following list is from the pen of Dr :— [HC 7:145]
Samuel M. Marr
The foregoing have been aided and abetted by:—
and family
P. T. Rolfe
W. J. Higbee William J Higbee
William Cook and Sarah his wife, formerly Sarah Crooks of Manchester.”
30 June 1844 • Sunday
30 Sunday 30. The wrote to , as follows:—
“Head Quarters,
June 30th 1844
,
It is my present opinion that the Mormons will not commit any out break, and that no further alarm need be apprehended. I regret to learn that the party in who are in favor of violent measures have circulated a thousand false rumors of danger, for the purpose of getting men together without my authority, hoping that when assembled, they may be ready to join in their violent councils. This is a fraud upon the country, and must not be endured.
“I am afraid that the people of are fast depriving themselves of the sympathy of their fellow citizens, and of the world. I strictly order and enjoin on you that you permit no attack on , or any of the people there without my authority. I think it would be best to disband your [p. 239]
Page 239