History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 273
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<​July 16​> put into my hands by Sister Phelps, one from and one from of , both confirming the report of the death of Joseph and — they were murdered in Jail. It is not for me to counsel you, but I would ask if it would not be well for you to come direct to and hold a Council with the Twelve, and decide what course to pursue. Things are still very critical in the west, we don’t know where it will end. I spent the Sabbath here— spoke three times— comforted the Saints all I could, and had a good time: The Saints bear the shock well. I am well and in good spirits. I do not know where I can address my letters to reach you. I shall write to Lowell, Peterboro’ and Bradford hoping they may reach you in one of those places. I shall go immediately to Farmington, New Haven Ct. and ; if you wish to write to me, direct to Farmington, Ct.
Yours in the Kingdom of God
having received ’s letter at Peterboro’, started for , but on arriving at Lowell, remained all night.
17 July 1844 • Wednesday
<​17​> Wednesday 17. Mrs. , in company with Messrs. and , went to , for letters of administration on the estate of her deceased husband, Joseph Smith. [HC 7:194]
The following is from ’s Journal:—
“Elder arrived in this morning. I walked with him to 57 Temple St, and called upon Sister Vose: took the bed <​& gave vent to his feeling in tears​>, and I <​took​> the big chair, and I here veiled my face, and for the first time we gave vent to my <​our​> <​my​> grief and mourning for the Prophet and of the Church, Joseph and , who were murdered by a gentile mob: after being bathed in a flood of tears I felt composed. left the ; I spent the night at Bro. Phelps’.”
The following is extracted from the Transcript taken from the report of the Editor of the Republican:—
“On our return we stopped at , where the State Commissioners were joined by Col. Wood, the Mayor of , and Mr Conyers. The <​​> gentlemen had returned from through , and had been laboring to establish peace between the parties. The people of , however, appear to be averse to any compromise, short of the removal of the Mormons from the . They assert that it is now absolutely necessary to peace and quietness, that either the Mormons or citizens quit the , and that sooner or later one must go, even if force be necessary to accomplish it. Mr Jonas, one of the commissioners, addressed the citizens of , and called upon them to say whether they would support the in enforcing the law and upholding the constitution, and they unanimously refused to give the pledge. The same evening a of , who professed to speak in the name of the citizens of , uttered the same sentiment. He deprecated as impossible the idea of settlement if the Mormons were to remain. A committee of the citizens waited upon , informing him of their fixed conviction that it was necessary one of the parties should leave the , and [p. 273]
July 16 put into my hands by Sister Phelps, one from and one from of , both confirming the report of the death of Joseph and — they were murdered in Jail. It is not for me to counsel you, but I would ask if it would not be well for you to come direct to and hold a Council with the Twelve, and decide what course to pursue. Things are still very critical in the west, we don’t know where it will end. I spent the Sabbath here— spoke three times— comforted the Saints all I could, and had a good time: The Saints bear the shock well. I am well and in good spirits. I do not know where I can address my letters to reach you. I shall write to Lowell, Peterboro’ and Bradford hoping they may reach you in one of those places. I shall go immediately to Farmington, New Haven Ct. and ; if you wish to write to me, direct to Farmington, Ct.
Yours in the Kingdom of God
having received ’s letter at Peterboro’, started for , but on arriving at Lowell, remained all night.
17 July 1844 • Wednesday
17 Wednesday 17. Mrs. , in company with Messrs. and , went to , for letters of administration on the estate of her deceased husband, Joseph Smith. [HC 7:194]
The following is from ’s Journal:—
“Elder arrived in this morning. I walked with him to 57 Temple St, and called upon Sister Vose: took the bed & gave vent to his feeling in tears, I took the big chair, and veiled my face, and for the first time gave vent to my grief and mourning for the Prophet and of the Church, Joseph and , who were murdered by a gentile mob: after being bathed in a flood of tears I felt composed. left the ; I spent the night at Bro. Phelps’.”
The following is extracted from the Transcript taken from the report of the Editor of the Republican:—
“On our return we stopped at , where the State Commissioners were joined by Col. Wood, the Mayor of , and Mr Conyers. The gentlemen had returned from through , and had been laboring to establish peace between the parties. The people of , however, appear to be averse to any compromise, short of the removal of the Mormons from the . They assert that it is now absolutely necessary to peace and quietness, that either the Mormons or citizens quit the , and that sooner or later one must go, even if force be necessary to accomplish it. Mr Jonas, one of the commissioners, addressed the citizens of , and called upon them to say whether they would support the in enforcing the law and upholding the constitution, and they unanimously refused to give the pledge. The same evening a of , who professed to speak in the name of the citizens of , uttered the same sentiment. He deprecated as impossible the idea of settlement if the Mormons were to remain. A committee of the citizens waited upon , informing him of their fixed conviction that it was necessary one of the parties should leave the , and [p. 273]
Page 273