History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 265
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<​July 10​> bosoms envy, hatred and all ungodliness. This is the true secret of all their barbarous movements against Mormonism— and they supposed by destroying the Smiths they should extinguish their religion, disperse the Mormons, depopulating and desolating . Their folly and wickedness will produce a result exactly the reverse— Mormons will increase an hundred fold, they will if possible be more devoutly attached to their religion; will concentrate more closely together, for self preservation, and their united industry will produce such a city, at , as does not exist west of the mountains.
“From all accounts which have been published here, it does not appear that the slightest resistance was made to the execution of the law, and the inquiry is now made, what was all this clamor, excitement and military parade for? The of the Signal can answer the question, and if he had his deserts, it is probable no more unprincipled and inflammatory addresses to an infuriated mob would ever emanate from his pen. Not that I would wish any violence to him, but he should be tried by the laws of the , and see how far his course renders him accountable for the murders which have been committed.
“Nothing has ever given me greater gratification than the calm, dignified submission to the laws shown at since the death of the Smiths. This forbearance on your part is beyond all praise: let it continue. Give not the shadow of a pretext for another appeal [HC 7:181] to popular fury. The demons are foiled, and let then gnash their teeth in silence over their disappointment.
“The increase of population at can no more be prevented than the can be stopped in its course. Its triumph is inevitable, because the engine by which it is <​to be​> accomplished is irresistable. What earthly power has ever yet stood before the overpowering energies of a religious creed? But when religion is protected by law, as your religion ought to be, and will soon be, in , then such advances will be made by the Mormons as have never been dreamed by the greatest enthusiast”
The editor of the Neighbor adds:
“Upon this letter, let it be remembered that the writer is not a Mormon or a western man, but a citizen of , loving law, liberty and life.”
From the Tompkins (N. Y.) Democrat, we extract the following:—
“The report that a battle had been fought between the Mormons and anti-Mormons, in which some five hundred were slain, is all a hoax. Such vile statements only serve to give strength to the Prophets views. Indeed, we do not know which has the worst effect on <​the​> community— the doctrines of Smith, or the ten thousand false rumors constantly put in circulation against him. One thing is certain; his name will survive, when those who grossly misrepresent him have become blanks on the page of the future.” [HC 7:182]
11 July 1844 • Thursday
<​11​> Thursday 11. Elder called upon Elder , likewise brs. <​Samuel​> Russell, and ; also upon br. to inquire about the lumber for the .
Elders and travelled to Peterboro, for the purpose of attending conference.
Elders , and others went to Wilmington and preached [p. 265]
July 10 bosoms envy, hatred and all ungodliness. This is the true secret of all their barbarous movements against Mormonism— and they supposed by destroying the Smiths they should extinguish their religion, disperse the Mormons, depopulating and desolating . Their folly and wickedness will produce a result exactly the reverse— Mormons will increase an hundred fold, they will if possible be more devoutly attached to their religion; will concentrate more closely together, for self preservation, and their united industry will produce such a city, at , as does not exist west of the mountains.
“From all accounts which have been published here, it does not appear that the slightest resistance was made to the execution of the law, and the inquiry is now made, what was all this clamor, excitement and military parade for? The of the Signal can answer the question, and if he had his deserts, it is probable no more unprincipled and inflammatory addresses to an infuriated mob would ever emanate from his pen. Not that I would wish any violence to him, but he should be tried by the laws of the , and see how far his course renders him accountable for the murders which have been committed.
“Nothing has ever given me greater gratification than the calm, dignified submission to the laws shown at since the death of the Smiths. This forbearance on your part is beyond all praise: let it continue. Give not the shadow of a pretext for another appeal [HC 7:181] to popular fury. The demons are foiled, and let then gnash their teeth in silence over their disappointment.
“The increase of population at can no more be prevented than the can be stopped in its course. Its triumph is inevitable, because the engine by which it is to be accomplished is irresistable. What earthly power has ever yet stood before the overpowering energies of a religious creed? But when religion is protected by law, as your religion ought to be, and will soon be, in , then such advances will be made by the Mormons as have never been dreamed by the greatest enthusiast”
The editor of the Neighbor adds:
“Upon this letter, let it be remembered that the writer is not a Mormon or a western man, but a citizen of , loving law, liberty and life.”
From the Tompkins (N. Y.) Democrat, we extract the following:—
“The report that a battle had been fought between the Mormons and anti-Mormons, in which some five hundred were slain, is all a hoax. Such vile statements only serve to give strength to the Prophets views. Indeed, we do not know which has the worst effect on the community— the doctrines of Smith, or the ten thousand false rumors constantly put in circulation against him. One thing is certain; his name will survive, when those who grossly misrepresent him have become blanks on the page of the future.” [HC 7:182]
11 July 1844 • Thursday
11 Thursday 11. Elder called upon Elder , likewise brs. Samuel Russell, and ; also upon br. to inquire about the lumber for the .
Elders and travelled to Peterboro, for the purpose of attending conference.
Elders , and others went to Wilmington and preached [p. 265]
Page 265