History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 264
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<​July 10​> were shot by a mob at . We are incredulous in regard to the truth of this rumor. We cannot think under the circumstances of the case, the excitement against these men among the anti-mormons, would have received them as prisoners, to be tried under our laws, had pledged himself for their protection, and then placed them in a situation where they would be murdered. The rumor is too preposterous for belief. We wait with much anxiety to hear the truth on this subject; and this feeling is general in this community.”
From the Republican:—
The murders at .— A letter from the editor, one from G. L. M. Davis, Esq., and a proclamation from , give all the information which we have been able to collect from the seat of civil commotion and murder in . They were issued in an extra from <​form​> yesterday morning, and are transferred to our columns to day for the benefit of our numerous readers abroad. All our information tends to fix upon the people concerned in the death of the Smiths, the odium of perfidious, blackhearted cowardly murder— so wanton, as to be without any justification— so inhuman and treacherous, as to find no parallel in savage life under any circumstances. declares his intention to seek out the murderers, and he owes it to his own honor and to that of the , whose faith was most grossly violated, never to cease his exertions for this purpose. The Mormons, it will be seen, were quiet, and not disposed to commit any acts of aggression: their enemies, on the other hand, were evidently disposed to push them to extremities, and to force them <​from​> the . This feeling may be checked by the alacrity with which ’s orders were being executed, but it will be sometime before peace and order can be restored— the disgrace of past acts cannot be wiped out.”
The following extract of a letter from a highly respectable gentleman to his friend in , we copy from the Nauvoo Neighbor:—
(Ct.) July 10. 1844.
“I have by the papers, within a day or two, been informed of the [HC 7:180] murder of Joseph and . This is an event which will be deeply lamented by all Mormons, and will appear probably to those who are not Mormons, as the final overthrow of their religious tenets.— I will, however, make the prediction that this diabolical butchery, makes more Mormons than the friendship of half the inhabitants in could have done by their most devoted exertions. The blood of Saints is the seed of the Church. It will be considered by an extensive portion of the world, that the Smiths have suffered martyrdom for their religion, and their profoundest sympathies will be aroused in favor of those believeing the same creed. The inflammatory appeals to the blood-thirsty passions of the anti-mormon populace will be universally condemned by the reflecting and moral part of every community, and thousands will now examine your tenets, who never thought of such a thing before. and will be denounced by the honorable; and the indelible disgrace with which they now stand covered, will cause them to be avoided by every person who has any regard to his personal safety. It is now known here, that the lazy speculators of , and the still lazier <​office​> drones at , cared nothing for Joe Smith personally, or for his tenets either; but the prosperity of increasing as it did, beyond any former parallel, even in the western world, excited in their [p. 264]
July 10 were shot by a mob at . We are incredulous in regard to the truth of this rumor. We cannot think under the circumstances of the case, the excitement against these men among the anti-mormons, would have received them as prisoners, to be tried under our laws, had pledged himself for their protection, and then placed them in a situation where they would be murdered. The rumor is too preposterous for belief. We wait with much anxiety to hear the truth on this subject; and this feeling is general in this community.”
From the Republican:—
The murders at .— A letter from the editor, one from G. L. M. Davis, Esq., and a proclamation from , give all the information which we have been able to collect from the seat of civil commotion and murder in . They were issued in an extra form yesterday morning, and are transferred to our columns to day for the benefit of our numerous readers abroad. All our information tends to fix upon the people concerned in the death of the Smiths, the odium of perfidious, blackhearted cowardly murder— so wanton, as to be without any justification— so inhuman and treacherous, as to find no parallel in savage life under any circumstances. declares his intention to seek out the murderers, and he owes it to his own honor and to that of the , whose faith was most grossly violated, never to cease his exertions for this purpose. The Mormons, it will be seen, were quiet, and not disposed to commit any acts of aggression: their enemies, on the other hand, were evidently disposed to push them to extremities, and to force them from the . This feeling may be checked by the alacrity with which ’s orders were being executed, but it will be sometime before peace and order can be restored— the disgrace of past acts cannot be wiped out.”
The following extract of a letter from a highly respectable gentleman to his friend in , we copy from the Nauvoo Neighbor:—
(Ct.) July 10. 1844.
“I have by the papers, within a day or two, been informed of the [HC 7:180] murder of Joseph and . This is an event which will be deeply lamented by all Mormons, and will appear probably to those who are not Mormons, as the final overthrow of their religious tenets.— I will, however, make the prediction that this diabolical butchery, makes more Mormons than the friendship of half the inhabitants in could have done by their most devoted exertions. The blood of Saints is the seed of the Church. It will be considered by an extensive portion of the world, that the Smiths have suffered martyrdom for their religion, and their profoundest sympathies will be aroused in favor of those believeing the same creed. The inflammatory appeals to the blood-thirsty passions of the anti-mormon populace will be universally condemned by the reflecting and moral part of every community, and thousands will now examine your tenets, who never thought of such a thing before. and will be denounced by the honorable; and the indelible disgrace with which they now stand covered, will cause them to be avoided by every person who has any regard to his personal safety. It is now known here, that the lazy speculators of , and the still lazier office drones at , cared nothing for Joe Smith personally, or for his tenets either; but the prosperity of increasing as it did, beyond any former parallel, even in the western world, excited in their [p. 264]
Page 264