History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<​ May 16​> society; and this I can do without prejudice or animosity against any man or set of men. I believe in the broad principle of equal rights and privileges, so far as religion or politics are concerned; and while I seek to enjoy my religion according to the knowledge in me, I will interfere with the rights of no man, nor persecute because my neighbor does not think as I do.
“A multitude of business compels me to close, and I must forbear.
I have the honor to be your brother in the everlasting covenant,
.”
, May 16th., 1844.”
From the Neighbor:—
Steam Boat Election.
“On the last upward voyage of the ‘Osprey’ from to this place, as usual the merits of the several candidates for the next Presidential election was discussed. A vote was taken, and the following was the [HC 6:384] ‘state of the polls’ as handed to us by a gentleman who came as passenger:
Gen. J. Smith, 26 gentlemen, 3 ladies
, 6 " 2 "
, 2 " 0 ".
“The ladies are altogether forsaking , and the gentlemen as a matter of course are following after. There is a wonderful shrinkage in , but the General is going it with a rush.
Hurrah for the General!” [HC 6:385]
17 May 1844 • Friday
<​17​> Friday, 17 The State Convention met in the Assembly Room; I copy the minutes:—
“Convention met according to appointment, and was organized by appointing Gen. to the chair, and Dr.F. Merryweather, secretary.
“Dr. presented the following letter, and took his seat in the Convention. Several letters of the same character were presented by other gentlemen, but we have not room to insert them.
‘Muscoutah, St. Clair Co., Ill.
May 4th., 1844
‘Mr. ,
Sir,
At various meetings held in this county, where I have had the honor of attending; and the interesting topic of the selection of a suitable person for the high station of President of the being at this time the most important to Americans, and with the names that are now before the people, Joseph Smith of is recognized respectfully as a candidate, declarative in the principles of Jeffersonianism, or Jefferson Democracy, Free trade and Sailors’ rights, and the protection of person and property.
‘A Convention being about to be held in the City of on the 17th of this month, (May) your name has been on every occasion given as a delegate to said convention, and through me the message to be imparted you, asking you to represent our expressions in the case.
‘Please say for us as Americans, that we will support Gen. Joseph Smith in preference to any other man that has given, or suffered his name to come before us as a candidate. And that at the great Baltimore Convention, to be held on the 13th of July, our delegation to said convention be authorized to proclaim for us submission to the Nominee as may be by them brought before the people in case of a failure to [HC 6:386] nominate Joseph Smith, (our choice) and unite approbatively [p. 39]
May 16 society; and this I can do without prejudice or animosity against any man or set of men. I believe in the broad principle of equal rights and privileges, so far as religion or politics are concerned; and while I seek to enjoy my religion according to the knowledge in me, I will interfere with the rights of no man, nor persecute because my neighbor does not think as I do.
“A multitude of business compels me to close, and I must forbear.
I have the honor to be your brother in the everlasting covenant,
.”
, May 16th., 1844.”
From the Neighbor:—
Steam Boat Election.
“On the last upward voyage of the ‘Osprey’ from to this place, as usual the merits of the several candidates for the next Presidential election was discussed. A vote was taken, and the following was the [HC 6:384] ‘state of the polls’ as handed to us by a gentleman who came as passenger:
Gen. J. Smith, 26 gentlemen, 3 ladies
, 6 " 2 "
, 2 " 0 ".
“The ladies are altogether forsaking , and the gentlemen as a matter of course are following after. There is a wonderful shrinkage in , but the General is going it with a rush.
Hurrah for the General!” [HC 6:385]
17 May 1844 • Friday
17 Friday, 17 The State Convention met in the Assembly Room; I copy the minutes:—
“Convention met according to appointment, and was organized by appointing Gen. to the chair, and Dr.F. Merryweather, secretary.
“Dr. presented the following letter, and took his seat in the Convention. Several letters of the same character were presented by other gentlemen, but we have not room to insert them.
‘Muscoutah, St. Clair Co., Ill.
May 4th., 1844
‘Mr. ,
Sir,
At various meetings held in this county, where I have had the honor of attending; and the interesting topic of the selection of a suitable person for the high station of President of the being at this time the most important to Americans, and with the names that are now before the people, Joseph Smith of is recognized respectfully as a candidate, declarative in the principles of Jeffersonianism, or Jefferson Democracy, Free trade and Sailors’ rights, and the protection of person and property.
‘A Convention being about to be held in the City of on the 17th of this month, (May) your name has been on every occasion given as a delegate to said convention, and through me the message to be imparted you, asking you to represent our expressions in the case.
‘Please say for us as Americans, that we will support Gen. Joseph Smith in preference to any other man that has given, or suffered his name to come before us as a candidate. And that at the great Baltimore Convention, to be held on the 13th of July, our delegation to said convention be authorized to proclaim for us submission to the Nominee as may be by them brought before the people in case of a failure to [HC 6:386] nominate Joseph Smith, (our choice) and unite approbatively [p. 39]
Page 39