History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 121
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<​June 18​> a man by the name of Norton had threatened to shoot me; an examination was immediately had, but no proof found.
This evening I appointed Armorer General of the Legion.
I insert the following affidavit:—
Hancock County,)
City of )
“June 18th 1844.
Personally appeared before me, , a Justice of the Peace, and Gilbert Belknap of , and being duly sworn, depose and say, that on yesterday, June 17th, 1844, [HC 6:502] at , certain persons to wit, Dr. [blank] Barnes and , having entered into conversation with your deponents, among other things, declared that the of was as big a scoundrel as Joseph Smith, and that he is the d——dst scoundrel that was ever suffered to live— that they did not care for the , and had rather that the would side with Smith— that they (the Mob) were coming to with a sufficient force to take Smith, and if the people endeavored to prevent them— that they should kill the people— and that if Smith had left , they had determined to destroy the and other buildings. And your deponents further say that one John Eller declared that he had lived in and was at the Massacre of the Mormons at — that he had killed one Mormon, and that he had left on purpose to fight the Mormons, and would hunt a Mormon as he would a deer. And your deponents further say that they heard that about one hundred persons had already arrived from , and were expecting a[s] many more from that . And your Deponents further say that they heard in that they had already received a number of guns and ammunition, and provisions from , in order to prosecute their attack upon ; and further your Deponents say not.
Gilbert Belknap.
“Sworn and subscribed to before me this eighteenth day of June 1844.
, a Justice of the Peace.” [HC 6:503]
19 June 1844 • Wednesday
<​19​> Wednesday 19 The Legion assembled on the parade ground. A company of the Legion came in from Green Plains about 11 A. M.; I met them at the front of my , and an escort came down from the parade ground below the , and escorted them to the ground.
At 1 P. M, a company of volunteers arrived from , and were also escorted to the parade ground.
On Sunday the 16th a committee of the mob, headed by James Charles, a constable <​of ,​> went to the house of Captain , who lives four miles south east of , and required him to call out his company to join the posse of to go to and arrest me and the City Council; he peremptorily refused to comply with their request; the same posse returned on the 17th with an order as they stated from the , which believed (and no doubt correctly) to be a forgery, and therefore still refused to go on any terms; the posse then reported his refusal to , who appointed a committee of Twelve, to lynch, tar, and feather on the 18th, which committee went that evening, and arrived about midnight. , who had been informed of ’s order, prepared himself for defence and kept watch; as soon as they came, and he saw their number, and that they were [HC 6:504] provided with tar bucket, bag of feathers, and a bundle of withs, in addition to their fire arms, he blew out his light and placed himself in a suitable position to defend the door (which he had fastened, and [p. 121]
June 18 a man by the name of Norton had threatened to shoot me; an examination was immediately had, but no proof found.
This evening I appointed Armorer General of the Legion.
I insert the following affidavit:—
Hancock County,)
City of )
“June 18th 1844.
Personally appeared before me, , a Justice of the Peace, and Gilbert Belknap of , and being duly sworn, depose and say, that on yesterday, June 17th, 1844, [HC 6:502] at , certain persons to wit, Dr. [blank] Barnes and , having entered into conversation with your deponents, among other things, declared that the of was as big a scoundrel as Joseph Smith, and that he is the d——dst scoundrel that was ever suffered to live— that they did not care for the , and had rather that the would side with Smith— that they (the Mob) were coming to with a sufficient force to take Smith, and if the people endeavored to prevent them— that they should kill the people— and that if Smith had left , they had determined to destroy the and other buildings. And your deponents further say that one John Eller declared that he had lived in and was at the Massacre of the Mormons at — that he had killed one Mormon, and that he had left on purpose to fight the Mormons, and would hunt a Mormon as he would a deer. And your deponents further say that they heard that about one hundred persons had already arrived from , and were expecting as many more from that . And your Deponents further say that they heard in that they had already received a number of guns and ammunition, and provisions from , in order to prosecute their attack upon ; and further your Deponents say not.
Gilbert Belknap.
“Sworn and subscribed to before me this eighteenth day of June 1844.
, a Justice of the Peace.” [HC 6:503]
19 June 1844 • Wednesday
19 Wednesday 19 The Legion assembled on the parade ground. A company of the Legion came in from Green Plains about 11 A. M.; I met them at the front of my , and an escort came down from the parade ground below the , and escorted them to the ground.
At 1 P. M, a company of volunteers arrived from , and were also escorted to the parade ground.
On Sunday the 16th a committee of the mob, headed by James Charles, a constable of , went to the house of Captain , who lives four miles south east of , and required him to call out his company to join the posse of to go to and arrest me and the City Council; he peremptorily refused to comply with their request; the same posse returned on the 17th with an order as they stated from the , which believed (and no doubt correctly) to be a forgery, and therefore still refused to go on any terms; the posse then reported his refusal to , who appointed a committee of Twelve, to lynch, tar, and feather on the 18th, which committee went that evening, and arrived about midnight. , who had been informed of ’s order, prepared himself for defence and kept watch; as soon as they came, and he saw their number, and that they were [HC 6:504] provided with tar bucket, bag of feathers, and a bundle of withs, in addition to their fire arms, he blew out his light and placed himself in a suitable position to defend the door (which he had fastened, and [p. 121]
Page 121