Memorial to the United States Senate and House of Representatives, circa 30 October 1839–27 January 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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overture of peace; and as the pledge of a safe conduct was given; , , Joseph Smith Junr., , and started for the camp of the Militia <​besiegers.​>. Before they arrived at the camp of the ’s Troops <​under this invitation,​> they were surrounded on all sides by the invading army; and by an order from placed under a strong guard and marched in triumph into camp, when they were told that they were “prisoners of war.” A court martial was held that night, without a hearing on the part of the Mormon delegates, and in the absence of all testimony, these men, who had thus trusted their lives to the honor of the ’s officers, were condemned to be shot next morning. The of this bloody sentence was only prevented by the manly protest of . He denounced the act as cold blooded murder, and immediately withdrew his Brigade from the scene, where this horrible outrage was to be perpetrated. This noble stand taken by arrested the murder of the prisoners. It is here worthy of remark, and we repeat it more in sorrow than in anger, that seventeen preachers of the Gospel were on this court marshal, and horrible to relate were in favor of this merciless sentence. The next morning, the Prisoners were marched under a strong guard to the , the seat of Justice in <​of​> , where they were detained for a week or two, and then marched to where <​was​> encamped with his troops. Here a Court of inquiry <​Examination​> was held before which continued from the 11th to the 28th of November; during which time, these five prisoners were confined in chains with about fifty other Mormon prisoners taken at “;” and were penned up in an open unfinished Court House. [p. 22]
overture of peace; and as the pledge of a safe conduct was given; , , Joseph Smith Junr., , and started for the camp of the besiegers.. Before they arrived at the camp of the ’s Troops under this invitation, they were surrounded on all sides by the invading army; and by an order from placed under a strong guard and marched in triumph into camp, when they were told that they were “prisoners of war.” A court martial was held that night, without a hearing on the part of the Mormon delegates, and in the absence of all testimony, these men, who had thus trusted their lives to the honor of the ’s officers, were condemned to be shot next morning. The of this bloody sentence was only prevented by the manly protest of . He denounced the act as cold blooded murder, and immediately withdrew his Brigade from the scene, where this horrible outrage was to be perpetrated. This noble stand taken by arrested the murder of the prisoners. It is here worthy of remark, and we repeat it more in sorrow than in anger, that seventeen preachers of the Gospel were on this court marshal, and horrible to relate were in favor of this merciless sentence. The next morning, the Prisoners were marched under a strong guard to , the seat of Justice of , where they were detained for a week or two, and then marched to where was encamped with his troops. Here a Court of Examination was held before which continued from the 11th to the 28th of November; during which time, these five prisoners were confined in chains with about fifty other Mormon prisoners taken at “;” and were penned up in an open unfinished Court House. [p. 22]
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