History, 1838–1856, volume B-1 [1 September 1834–2 November 1838]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 666
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received not so much as one kid to make merry with their friends <December 17 ’s Letter Continued.> These facts, with some others, have disqualified my mind for studying the Hebrew Language at present and believing as I do that I must sink or swim, or in other words take care of myself, I have thought that I should take the most efficient means in my power to get [HC 2:336] out of debt, and to this end I proposed taking the school; but if I am not thought competent to take the charge of it, or worthy to be placed in that station, I must devise some other means to help myself; although having been ordained to that office under your own hand with a promise that it should not be taken from me. The conclusion of the whole matter is such I am willing to continue and do all I can provided we can share equal benefits one with the other, and upon no other principle whatever. If one has his support from the “Public Crib,” let them all have it, but if one is pinched, I am willing to be, provided we are all alike. If the principle of impartiality and equity can be observed by all, I think that I will not peep again. If I am damned it will be for doing what I think is right. There have been two applications made to me to go into business since I talked of taking the school, but it is in the world, and I had rather remain in , if I can consistently. All I ask is right. I am Sir, with respect, Your
Obt. Servt .”—
To Presedent J. Smith Jnr. &c}.
< satisfied> Elder read the foregoing Copy himself and I explained upon the objections he had set forth in it, and satisfied his mind upon every point, perfectly; and he observed after I had got through that he was more than satisfied, and would attend the Hebrew School and took the parting hand with me with every expression of friendship that a gentleman and a Christian could manifest, which I felt to reciprocate with cheerfulness and entertain the best of feeling for him, and most cheerfully forgive him the ingratitude which was manifested in his letter, Knowing that it was for want of correct information, that his mind was disturbed, as far as his reflections related to me.
But on the part of the committee he was not treated right in all things, however all things are settled amicably, and no hardness exists between us and them. <* Note G. addenda page 2> [HC 2:337]
and called this evening to see me upon the subject of the difficulty that transpired at their house, on Wednesday evening between me and my brother . They were sorely afflicted in mind on account of that occurrence. I conversed with them and convinced them that I was not to blame in taking the course I did, but had acted in righteousness in all things on that occasion. I invited them to come and live with me: they consented to do so as soon as it is practicable
18 December 1835 • Friday
<18.> Friday morning 18th. Brother called to see me, and [p. 666]
received not so much as one kid to make merry with their friends December 17 ’s Letter Continued. These facts, with some others, have disqualified my mind for studying the Hebrew Language at present and believing as I do that I must sink or swim, or in other words take care of myself, I have thought that I should take the most efficient means in my power to get [HC 2:336] out of debt, and to this end I proposed taking the school; but if I am not thought competent to take the charge of it, or worthy to be placed in that station, I must devise some other means to help myself; although having been ordained to that office under your own hand with a promise that it should not be taken from me. The conclusion of the whole matter is such I am willing to continue and do all I can provided we can share equal benefits one with the other, and upon no other principle whatever. If one has his support from the “Public Crib,” let them all have it, but if one is pinched, I am willing to be, provided we are all alike. If the principle of impartiality and equity can be observed by all, I think that I will not peep again. If I am damned it will be for doing what I think is right. There have been two applications made to me to go into business since I talked of taking the school, but it is in the world, and I had rather remain in , if I can consistently. All I ask is right. I am Sir, with respect, Your
Obt. Servt .”—
To Presedent J. Smith Jnr. &c}.
satisfied Elder read the foregoing Copy himself and I explained upon the objections he had set forth in it, and satisfied his mind upon every point, perfectly; and he observed after I had got through that he was more than satisfied, and would attend the Hebrew School and took the parting hand with me with every expression of friendship that a gentleman and a Christian could manifest, which I felt to reciprocate with cheerfulness and entertain the best of feeling for him, and most cheerfully forgive him the ingratitude which was manifested in his letter, Knowing that it was for want of correct information, that his mind was disturbed, as far as his reflections related to me.
But on the part of the committee he was not treated right in all things, however all things are settled amicably, and no hardness exists between us and them. * Note G. addenda page 2 [HC 2:337]
and called this evening to see me upon the subject of the difficulty that transpired at their house, on Wednesday evening between me and my brother . They were sorely afflicted in mind on account of that occurrence. I conversed with them and convinced them that I was not to blame in taking the course I did, but had acted in righteousness in all things on that occasion. I invited them to come and live with me: they consented to do so as soon as it is practicable
18 December 1835 • Friday
18. Friday morning 18th. Brother called to see me, and [p. 666]
Page 666