History, 1838–1856, volume B-1 [1 September 1834–2 November 1838]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 801
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whole camp was under motion, consisting of 529 <515> souls, 269 249 males,  <July 6> 266 females, 27 Tents; 59 waggons; 97 horses, 22 oxen, 69 cows, and 1  Bull,— was engineer. The camp traveled to chester  7. miles the first day, and pitched their tents in form of a hollow square,  <Camp.—> within a hollow square formed by their waggons.—

6 July 1838 • Friday

This day I received a letter from and dated  at , Ohio, expisive [expressive] of their good feelings, firmness in the faith,  prosperity &c, also another Letter from my , as follows;
<’s  Letter.> “Brother Joseph; “Nine miles from Indiana
I sit down to inform you of our situation at the present time. I started  from , Ohio, the 7th. of May, in company with , , , , and Lewis Rob[b]ins and family families, also .
We started with 15 horses, 7 waggons, and two cows. We have left two  horses by the way, sick, and a third horse (as it were our dependence) was  taken lame last evening, and is not able to travel, and we have  stopped to Doctor him. We were disappointed on every hand, before we  started in getting money. We got no assistance whatever, only as we have  taken in , and she has assisted us as far as her means extends.  We had, when we started $75. in money. We sold the two cows for thir teen dollars and fifty cents per cow. We have sold of your Goods to the  amount of $45.74 and now we have only $25. to carry 28 souls and  13 horses 500 miles. We have lived very close, and camped out  a[t] nights, notwithstanding the rain and cold, and my babe only  two weeks old when we started. is very feeble: and  are not well, and very much fatigued; has a severe cold, and  in fact, it is nothing but the prayer of faith and the power of God  that will sustain them. and bring them through. Our Carriage is good  and I think we shall be brought through. I leave it with you and   to devise some way to assist us to some more expence money.  We have had unaccountable bad roads, had our horses down in  the mud, and broke one waggon tongue and thills, and broke  down the carriage twice, and yet we are all alive and encamped  on a dry place for almost the first time. Poverty is a heavy load  but we are all obliged to welter under it. It is now dark and I  close. May the Lord bless you all and bring us together is my prayer  Amen.— All the arrangements that left for getting  money failed; They did not gain us one cent.

7–8 July 1838 • Saturday–Sunday

<Camp. 7> Saturday 7th The camp, moved forward to Aurrora 13 miles and  <Sunday 8> encamped for the Sabbath. Sunday 8th. there was some sickness in the camp.  They had held a public meeting and the Leaders informed them that the de stroyer was in their midst and some would fall victims unless  they adhered strictly to the covenant they had made, laid aside  all covetousness, and lived by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth  of the Lord. They were threatened, this night, with tar and feathers from  the mob, of the place; and were obliged to keep a close watch to keep  their horses from being stolen by the mob, who threw a club and hit  Elder Tyler on the breast.

8 July 1838 • Sunday

<Meeting at  > The three Revelations, which I received January  12th 1838, the day I left , were read in the public congregation at , [p. 801]
whole camp was under motion, consisting of 515 souls, 249 males, July 6 266 females, 27 Tents; 59 waggons; 97 horses, 22 oxen, 69 cows, and 1 Bull,— was engineer. The camp traveled to chester 7. miles the first day, and pitched their tents in form of a hollow square, Camp.— within a hollow square formed by their waggons.—

6 July 1838 • Friday

This day I received a letter from and dated at , Ohio, expisive [expressive] of their good feelings, firmness in the faith, prosperity &c, also another Letter from my , as follows;
’s Letter. “Brother Joseph; “Nine miles from Indiana
I sit down to inform you of our situation at the present time. I started from , Ohio, the 7th. of May, in company with , , , , and Lewis Robbins and families, also .
We started with 15 horses, 7 waggons, and two cows. We have left two horses by the way, sick, and a third horse (as it were our dependence) was taken lame last evening, and is not able to travel, and we have stopped to Doctor him. We were disappointed on every hand, before we started in getting money. We got no assistance whatever, only as we have taken in , and she has assisted us as far as her means extends. We had, when we started $75. in money. We sold the two cows for thirteen dollars and fifty cents per cow. We have sold of your Goods to the amount of $45.74 and now we have only $25. to carry 28 souls and 13 horses 500 miles. We have lived very close, and camped out at nights, notwithstanding the rain and cold, and my babe only two weeks old when we started. is very feeble: and are not well, and very much fatigued; has a severe cold, and in fact, it is nothing but the prayer of faith and the power of God that will sustain them. and bring them through. Our Carriage is good and I think we shall be brought through. I leave it with you and to devise some way to assist us to some more expence money. We have had unaccountable bad roads, had our horses down in the mud, and broke one waggon tongue and thills, and broke down the carriage twice, and yet we are all alive and encamped on a dry place for almost the first time. Poverty is a heavy load but we are all obliged to welter under it. It is now dark and I close. May the Lord bless you all and bring us together is my prayer Amen.— All the arrangements that left for getting money failed; They did not gain us one cent.

7–8 July 1838 • Saturday–Sunday

Camp. 7 Saturday 7th The camp, moved forward to Aurrora 13 miles and Sunday 8 encamped for the Sabbath. Sunday 8th. there was some sickness in the camp. They held a public meeting and the Leaders informed them that the destroyer was in their midst and some would fall victims unless they adhered strictly to the covenant they had made, laid aside all covetousness, and lived by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of the Lord. They were threatened, this night, with tar and feathers from the mob, of the place; and were obliged to keep a close watch to keep their horses from being stolen by the mob, who threw a club and hit Elder Tyler on the breast.

8 July 1838 • Sunday

Meeting at The three Revelations, which I received January 12th 1838, the day I left , were read in the public congregation at , [p. 801]
Page 801