History, 1838–1856, volume B-1 [1 September 1834–2 November 1838]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 837
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<October 15th.> be distinctly understood that this Company were Militia of the County of , acting under , agreeably to the order of , and the brethren were very careful in all their movements to act in strict accordance with the Constitutional laws of the Land. The special object of this march was to protect and repel the attacks of the Mob in Having some property in that County and having a house building there, I went up at the same time. While I was there a number of houses belonging to our people were burned by the [HC 3:162] mob, who committed many other depredations, such as driving off horses, sheep, cattle, hogs &c. A number whose houses were burned down as well as those who lived in scattered and lonely situations, fled into the Town for safety, and for shelter from the inclemency of the weather as a considerable snow storm took place on <17.> the 17th. and 18th.; women and children, some in the most delicate situations, were thus obliged to leave their homes, and travel several miles in order to effect their escape. My feelings were such as I cannot describe when I saw them flock into the village, almost entirely destitute of clothes, and only escaping with their lives. During this state of affairs arrived at , and was at the house of Colonel on the
<18th.> when the intelligence was brought, that the mob were burning houses; and also when women and children were fleeing for safety <page 7 of Addenda X> who held a commission in the 59th. Regiment under his () command, asked what was to be done. He told him that he must immediately, call out his men, and go and put them down. Accordingly a force was immediately raised for the purpose of quelling the mob, and in a short time were on their march with a determiniation to drive the mob, or die in the attempt; as they could bear such— treatment no longer. The mob having learned the orders of , and likewise being aware of the determination of the oppressed, they broke up their encampment and fled. The mob seeing that they could not succeed by force, now resorted to stratagem; and after re[HC 3:163]moving their property out of their houses, which were nothing but log cabins, they actually set fire to their own houses, <fired them>, and then reported to the authorities of the State that the Mormons were burning and destroying all before them.
19 October 1838 • Friday
<19> Elder quit his temporal business in England and gave himself wholly to the Ministry, and soon commenced preaching and baptising in .
As I was driven away from without the privilege of settling my business, I had previous to this employed Colonel as my agent to close all my affairs in the Eastern States; and as I have been accused of “running away, cheating my creditors” &c I will insert a few of the many cards and letters I have received from Gentlemen who have had the best opportunity of knowing my busi[HC 3:164]ness transactions and whose testimony comes unsolicited
October 19. 1838.— a card— We the undersigned being personal acquaintances of firmly beleive that the course which he has pursued in settling the claims, accounts &c against the former citizens of , has done much credit to himself, and all others that committed to him the care of adjusting their business with this community, which also furnishes evidence that there was no intention on their part of defrauding their creditors. Thomas Griffith— John S. Seymour”
21 October 1838 • Sunday
<21> About this time William Morgan Sheriff of , , Colonel , Doctor Samuel Venable, Jonathan J. Dryden, James Stone, Thomas J. Martin, made communications or affidavits of the most inflammatory kind, charging upon the Mormons those depradations which had been committed by the Mob endeavoring thereby to raise the anger of those in authority, rally a sufficient force around their Standard, [p. 837]
October 15th. be distinctly understood that this Company were Militia of the County of , acting under , agreeably to the order of , and the brethren were very careful in all their movements to act in strict accordance with the Constitutional laws of the Land. The special object of this march was to protect and repel the attacks of the Mob in Having some property in that County and having a house building there, I went up at the same time. While I was there a number of houses belonging to our people were burned by the [HC 3:162] mob, who committed many other depredations, such as driving off horses, sheep, cattle, hogs &c. A number whose houses were burned down as well as those who lived in scattered and lonely situations, fled into the Town for safety, and for shelter from the inclemency of the weather as a considerable snow storm took place on 17. the 17th. and 18th.; women and children, some in the most delicate situations, were thus obliged to leave their homes, and travel several miles in order to effect their escape. My feelings were such as I cannot describe when I saw them flock into the village, almost entirely destitute of clothes, and only escaping with their lives. During this state of affairs arrived at , and was at the house of Colonel on the
18th. when the intelligence was brought, that the mob were burning houses; and also when women and children were fleeing for safety page 7 of Addenda X who held a commission in the 59th. Regiment under his () command, asked what was to be done. He told him that he must immediately, call out his men, and go and put them down. Accordingly a force was immediately raised for the purpose of quelling the mob, and in a short time were on their march with a determiniation to drive the mob, or die in the attempt; as they could bear such— treatment no longer. The mob having learned the orders of , and likewise being aware of the determination of the oppressed, they broke up their encampment and fled. The mob seeing that they could not succeed by force, now resorted to stratagem; and after re[HC 3:163]moving their property out of their houses, which were nothing but log cabins, they , fired them, and then reported to the authorities of the State that the Mormons were burning and destroying all before them.
19 October 1838 • Friday
19 Elder quit his temporal business in England and gave himself wholly to the Ministry, and soon commenced preaching and baptising in .
As I was driven away from without the privilege of settling my business, I had previous to this employed Colonel as my agent to close all my affairs in the Eastern States; and as I have been accused of “running away, cheating my creditors” &c I will insert a few of the many cards and letters I have received from Gentlemen who have had the best opportunity of knowing my busi[HC 3:164]ness transactions and whose testimony comes unsolicited
October 19. 1838.— a card— We the undersigned being personal acquaintances of firmly beleive that the course which he has pursued in settling the claims, accounts &c against the former citizens of , has done much credit to himself, and all others that committed to him the care of adjusting their business with this community, which also furnishes evidence that there was no intention on their part of defrauding their creditors. Thomas Griffith— John S. Seymour”
21 October 1838 • Sunday
21 About this time William Morgan Sheriff of , , Colonel , Doctor Samuel Venable, Jonathan J. Dryden, James Stone, Thomas J. Martin, made communications or affidavits of the most inflammatory kind, charging upon the Mormons those depradations which had been committed by the Mob endeavoring thereby to raise the anger of those in authority, rally a sufficient force around their Standard, [p. 837]
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