History, 1838–1856, volume B-1 [1 September 1834–2 November 1838]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 849
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<November 1   to > wrote from Jefferson City that he considered full and ample  powers were vested in him to carry into effect the former orders— says
The case is now  a very plain one— the Mormons must be subdued and peace restored to the Community.  you will therefore proceed without delay to execute the former orders. Full confidence  is reposed in your ability to do so; your force will be amply sufficient to accomplish the  object. Should you need the aid of Artillery, I would suggest that an application be  made to the commanding Officer of Fort Leavenworth, for such as you may need—  You are authorized to request the loan of it in the name <of the State> of .” “The  Ringleaders of this rebellion should be made an example of; and, if it should become  necessary for the public peace, the Mormons should be exterminated or expelled from  the State”
<gave up arms  Mob marched into  > This morning ordered the Militia to give up  their arms. < having made a treaty with the Mob on his own responsibility, to carry out his treachery marched the troops out of the and the brethren gave up their arms, their own  property which no Government on earth had a right to require> The mob (called ’s troops) then marched into Town and under  pretence of searching for arms tore up floors, upset hay stacks, plundering the most  valuable effects they could lay their hands on, and wasted and destroyed a great  amount of property which could do themselves no good, compelled the brethren to  sign deeds of trust at the point of the bayonet to pay the expences of the Mob—  even while the chastity of the place was desecrated, about Eighty men were taken  Prisoners, the remainder were ordered to leave the , and the remainder of the  Citizens were forbid to be more than three in a place, and if they were, the mob would  shoot at them—
2 November 1838 • Friday
<2> Friday 2. About this time was found by the Mob secreted in the Hazle Brush  some miles from , and brought into Camp where they were “hail fellows,  well met,” for told them that Danitism was an order of the Church, and  by his lying tried to make the Church a scape goat for his sins. We were taken  to the Town, into the public square; and before our departure from , we, after  much entreaties, were suffered to see our families, being attended all the while with  a strong guard; I found and children in tears, who expected we were shot by  those who had sworn to take our lives, and that they should see me no more. When  I entered my house, they clung to my garments, their eyes streaming with tears, while  mingled emotions of joy and sorrow were manifest in their countenances. I requested  to have a private interview with them a few minutes, but this privilege was denied me.  I was then obliged to take my departure, but who can realize my feelings which I  <Joseph, torn from  his family.> experienced at that time; to be torn from my companion, and leaving her surrounded  with monsters in the shape of men, and my children too, not knowing how their  wants would be supplied; to be taken far from them in order that my enemies  might destroy me when they thought proper to do so. wept, my children  clung to me and were only thrust from me by the swords of the guards who guarded me.  I felt over whelmed while I witnessed the scene, and could only recommend them to  the care of that God, whose kindness had followed me to the present time; and who  alone could protect them, and deliver me from the hands of my enemies and restore  me to my family. I was then taken back to the Camp, and then I with the  <starts for > rest of my brethren, namely, , , , , and were started off for  Jackson County, and encamped at night on , under a strong guard commanded  by Generals and Wilson [p. 849]
November 1 to wrote from Jefferson City that he considered full and ample powers were vested in him to carry into effect the former orders— says
The case is now a very plain one— the Mormons must be subdued and peace restored to the Community. you will therefore proceed without delay to execute the former orders. Full confidence is reposed in your ability to do so; your force will be amply sufficient to accomplish the object. Should you need the aid of Artillery, I would suggest that an application be made to the commanding Officer of Fort Leavenworth, for such as you may need— You are authorized to request the loan of it in the name of the State of .” “The Ringleaders of this rebellion should be made an example of; and, if it should become necessary for the public peace, the Mormons should be exterminated or expelled from the State”
gave up arms Mob marched into This morning ordered the Militia to give up their arms. having made a treaty with the Mob on his own responsibility, to carry out his treachery marched the troops out of the and the brethren gave up their arms, their own property which no Government on earth had a right to require The mob (called ’s troops) then marched into Town and under pretence of searching for arms tore up floors, upset hay stacks, plundering the most valuable effects they could lay their hands on, and wasted and destroyed a great amount of property which could do themselves no good, compelled the brethren to sign deeds of trust at the point of the bayonet to pay the expences of the Mob— even while the chastity of the place was desecrated, about Eighty men were taken Prisoners, the remainder were ordered to leave the , and were forbid to be more than three in a place, and if they were, the mob would shoot at them—
2 November 1838 • Friday
2 Friday 2. About this time was found by the Mob secreted in the Hazle Brush some miles from , and brought into Camp where they were “hail fellows, well met,” for told them that Danitism was an order of the Church, and by his lying tried to make the Church a scape goat for his sins. We were taken to the Town, into the public square; and before our departure from , we, after much entreaties, were suffered to see our families, being attended all the while with a strong guard; I found and children in tears, who expected we were shot by those who had sworn to take our lives, and that they should see me no more. When I entered my house, they clung to my garments, their eyes streaming with tears, while mingled emotions of joy and sorrow were manifest in their countenances. I requested to have a private interview with them a few minutes, but this privilege was denied me. I was then obliged to take my departure, but who can realize my feelings which I Joseph, torn from his family. experienced at that time; to be torn from my companion, and leaving her surrounded with monsters in the shape of men, and my children too, not knowing how their wants would be supplied; to be taken far from them in order that my enemies might destroy me when they thought proper to do so. wept, my children clung to me and were only thrust from me by the swords of the guards who guarded me. I felt over whelmed while I witnessed the scene, and could only recommend them to the care of that God, whose kindness had followed me to the present time; and who alone could protect them, and deliver me from the hands of my enemies and restore me to my family. I was then taken back to the Camp, and then I with the starts for rest of my brethren, namely, , , , , and were started off for Jackson County, and encamped at night on , under a strong guard commanded by Generals and Wilson [p. 849]
Page 849