History, 1838–1856, volume B-1 [1 September 1834–2 November 1838]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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be printing printed, Which was severally read, and unanimously adopted,  <July 2> and meeting adjourned John Bird, chairman. John F. Doherty Secy.
, July 2d 1836.—

25 July 1836 • Monday

<25.  Letter of Joseph  Smith & others.> July, 25th. 1836. To and others.
Dear Brethren. Yours of the first instant, accompanying the proceedings  of a public meeting. held by the people of was duly received. We are  sorry that this disturbance has broken out— we do not consider it our  fault. You are better acquainted with circumstances, than we are, and  of course have been directed by wisdom in your moves, relative to  leaving the county. We forward you our letter to and  others, that you may know all that we have said. We advise that  you be not the first aggressors,— give no occasion, and if the people  will let you dispose of your property, settle your affairs and go in  peace, go. You have thus far had an assylum, and now seek another  as God may direct. Relative to your going to Wisconsin, we cannot  Say, we should think if you could stop short, in peace, you had  better. You know our feelings relative to not giving the first offence,  and also of protecting your wives and little ones, in case a mob  should seek their lives. We shall publish the proceedings of the pub lic meeting, with your answer, as well as our letter. We mean that  the world shall know all things as they transpire. If we are per secuted and driven men shall know it. Be wise, let prudence dic tate all your councils, preserve peace with all men, if possible, stand  by the constitution of your country, observe its principles, and above  all show yourselves men of God, worthy citizens, and we doubt  not, community ere long, will do you justice, and rise in indignation  against those who are the instigators of your suffering and affliction.  In the bonds of brotherly love we subscribe ourselves, as ever
, Joseph Smith, Junr, , , .
<Joseph’s Letter  to  and others.> The Letter to and others, referred to above was as follows
, Geauga County, Ohio, July 25th 1836. To Esqr.,  Peter Rogers. Esqr. James T. V. Thompson Esqr. Col.  , Doct. Woodson J. Moss, James M. Hughes, Esqr., , Esqr., and Esqr.:— Gentlemen. We have just  perused, with feelings of deep interest, an article in the “Far West,”  printed at , Clay County, Mo, containing the proceedings  of a public meeting of the citizens of said , upon the  subject of an excitement now prevailing among you, occasioned  either from false reports, against the church of Latter Day Saints,  or from the fact, that said church is dangerous to the welfare of  your country, and will, if suffered among you, cause the  ties of peace and friendship, so desireable among all men, to be  burst asunder, and bring war and desolation upon your now pleas ant homes. Under existing circumstances, While rumor is afloat  with her accustomed cunning, and while public opinion is fast  setting, like a flood-tide, against the members of said church, we  cannot but admire the candor, with which your preamble and  resolutions were clothed as presented to the citizens of , [p. 743]
be printed, Which was severally read, and unanimously adopted, July 2 and meeting adjourned John Bird, chairman. John F. Doherty Secy.
, July 2d 1836.—

25 July 1836 • Monday

25. Letter of Joseph Smith & others. July, 25th. 1836. To and others.
Dear Brethren. Yours of the first instant, accompanying the proceedings of a public meeting. held by the people of was duly received. We are sorry that this disturbance has broken out— we do not consider it our fault. You are better acquainted with circumstances, than we are, and of course have been directed by wisdom in your moves, relative to leaving the county. We forward you our letter to and others, that you may know all that we have said. We advise that you be not the first aggressors,— give no occasion, and if the people will let you dispose of your property, settle your affairs and go in peace, You have thus far had an assylum, and now seek another as God may direct. Relative to your going to Wisconsin, we cannot Say, we should think if you could stop short, in peace, you had better. You know our feelings relative to not giving the first offence, and also of protecting your wives and little ones, in case a mob should seek their lives. We shall publish the proceedings of the public meeting, with your answer, as well as our letter. We mean that the world shall know all things as they transpire. If we are persecuted and driven men shall know it. Be wise, let prudence dictate all your councils, preserve peace with all men, if possible, stand by the constitution of your country, observe its principles, and above all show yourselves men of God, worthy citizens, and we doubt not, community ere long, will do you justice, and rise in indignation against those who are the instigators of your suffering and affliction. In the bonds of brotherly love we subscribe ourselves, as ever
, Joseph Smith, Junr, , , .
Joseph’s Letter to and others. The Letter to and others, referred to above was as follows
, Geauga County, Ohio, July 25th 1836. To Esqr., Peter Rogers. Esqr. James T. V. Thompson Esqr. Col. , Doct. Woodson J. Moss, James M. Hughes, Esqr., , Esqr., and Esqr.:— Gentlemen. We have just perused, with feelings of deep interest, an article in the “Far West,” printed at , Clay County, Mo, containing the proceedings of a public meeting of the citizens of said , upon the subject of an excitement now prevailing among you, occasioned either from false reports, against the church of Latter Day Saints, or from the fact, that said church is dangerous to the welfare of your country, and will, if suffered among you, cause the ties of peace and friendship, so desireable among all men, to be burst asunder, and bring war and desolation upon your now pleasant homes. Under existing circumstances, While rumor is afloat with her accustomed cunning, and while public opinion is fast setting, like a flood-tide, against the members of said church, we cannot but admire the candor, with which your preamble and resolutions were clothed as presented to the citizens of , [p. 743]
Page 743