History, 1838–1856, volume B-1 [1 September 1834–2 November 1838]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 824
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<September 12> “themselves in readiness if required, all mounted and Riflemen except one company of  “Infantry” the troops will proceed immediately to the scene of excitement and insurrection”
13 September 1838 • Thursday
<13> About this time Sixty or more Mobbers entered and warned the Brethren to  leave the place.
13–14 September 1838 • Thursday–Friday
<Camp> Thursday 13. The camp travelled to Bolivia twelve miles. Brother Thornton’s child died  in the evening, and was buried on the morning of  <14> Friday 14, before the Camp started, which passed through , which it is  expected will soon be the Capital of , instead of Vandalia. Much opposition  was manifested at in the countenances of Men, in their hard and—  unrighteous remarks against Joseph Smith and the Church and in much laughing.  Fever and ague, and chills and fever are the prevailing diseases in this place. The  Drouth continues, the water in the Wells is very low, and many Springs entirely dry,  many families found stopping places before arriving here. The Camp is sometimes short  of food, both for man and beast, and they know what it is to be hungry; Their living  for the last one hundred miles, has been boiled corn, and shaving pudding, which is  made of new Corn ears shaved upon a jointer or fore plane. It is excellent with Milk  Butter or sweetning and with an occasional mixture of Pork, Flour, Potatoes, Pumpkins,  Melons &c makes a comfortable living. The Cobs and remaining Corn is given to the  horses so that nothing is lost; hence the proverb goes forth in the world “the Mormons would  starve a host of enemies to death, for they will live where every body else would die”  The Camp numbers about two hundred and sixty, there was five hundred and thirty  but they have been scattered to the four winds and it is because of selfishness—  covetousness, murmurings and complainings, and not having fulfilled their Covenants that  they have been thus scattered. Travelled twenty three miles and tented five miles west of  . 569 miles from
I was at home after three o clock in the evening
15 September 1838 • Saturday
<15  William Dryden’s  Statement> William Dryden Justice of the Peace in . stated to the in a long  communication,
“that he had issued a Writ against Andrew , and others  for assaulting and threatning on the Eighth of August last and that the  Officer with a guard of ten men in attempting to serve the Writ, was forcibly driven from  the Town where the Offenders were supposed to be, and that the Mormons were so well  armed and so numerous in and , that the judicial power of the Counties  was wholly unable to execute a writ against a Mormon, and that the Mormons held the  Institutions of the Country in utter contempt.”
with many more such lies of the blackest  kind.
< order  to > Upon which issued an order to General of the  third division of Militia, through the Adjutant General B. M. Lisle, to raise a—  sufficient force of troops under his command, and aid the civil officers in  to execute all writs and other processes, in their charge, and especially assist the officer  charged with the execution of a writ issued by William Dryden Justice of the Peace on the  twenty ninth of August last, for the arrest of , and others,  and bring the Offenders to Justice—
<’s letter to  > The following letter gives a tolerably fair view of the Movements of the Militia for a few days  past
“Head Quarters, 1st. Brig. 3rd. Div. . Mi. Camp at , Septr. 15. 1838.
“Maj. Gen. , Commanding 3rd. Div. . Mi. Sir In pursuance of your  orders, dated 11th. inst., I issued orders to Col. Wm. A. Dunn, commanding the 28th. Regiment, to raise four  companies of mounted riflemen, consisting of fifty men each, also to Col John Boulware,—  commanding the 70th. Regiment, to raise two Companies of mounted Riflemen, consisting each  of like number, to start forthwith for service in the Counties of and , on the  same day. Col Dunn obtained the four companies of volunteers required from the 28th. Regiment [p. 824]
September 12 “themselves in readiness if required, all mounted and Riflemen except one company of “Infantry” the troops will proceed immediately to the scene of excitement and insurrection”
13 September 1838 • Thursday
13 About this time Sixty or more Mobbers entered and warned the Brethren to leave the place.
13–14 September 1838 • Thursday–Friday
Camp Thursday 13. The camp travelled to Bolivia twelve miles. Brother Thornton’s child died in the evening, and was buried on the morning of 14 Friday 14, before the Camp started, which passed through , which it is expected will soon be the Capital of , instead of Vandalia. Much opposition was manifested at in the countenances of Men, in their hard and— unrighteous remarks against Joseph Smith and the Church and in much laughing. Fever and ague, and chills and fever are the prevailing diseases in this place. The Drouth continues, the water in the Wells is very low, and many Springs entirely dry, many families found stopping places before arriving here. The Camp is sometimes short of food, both for man and beast, and they know what it is to be hungry; Their living for the last one hundred miles, has been boiled corn, and shaving pudding, which is made of new Corn ears shaved upon a jointer or fore plane. It is excellent with Milk Butter or sweetning and with an occasional mixture of Pork, Flour, Potatoes, Pumpkins, Melons &c makes a comfortable living. The Cobs and remaining Corn is given to the horses so that nothing is lost; hence the proverb goes forth in the world “the Mormons would starve a host of enemies to death, for they will live where every body else would die” The Camp numbers about two hundred and sixty, there was five hundred and thirty but they have been scattered to the four winds and it is because of selfishness— covetousness, murmurings and complainings, and not having fulfilled their Covenants that they have been thus scattered. Travelled twenty three miles and tented five miles west of . 569 miles from
I was at home after three o clock in the evening
15 September 1838 • Saturday
15 William Dryden’s Statement William Dryden Justice of the Peace in . stated to the in a long communication,
“that he had issued a Writ against , and others for assaulting and threatning on the Eighth of August last and that the Officer with a guard of ten men in attempting to serve the Writ, was forcibly driven from the Town where the Offenders were supposed to be, and that the Mormons were so well armed and so numerous in and , that the judicial power of the Counties was wholly unable to execute a writ against a Mormon, and that the Mormons held the Institutions of the Country in utter contempt.”
with many more such lies of the blackest kind.
order to Upon which issued an order to General of the third division of Militia, through the Adjutant General B. M. Lisle, to raise a— sufficient force of troops under his command, and aid the civil officers in to execute all writs and other processes, in their charge, and especially assist the officer charged with the execution of a writ issued by William Dryden Justice of the Peace on the twenty ninth of August last, for the arrest of , and others, and bring the Offenders to Justice—
’s letter to The following letter gives a tolerably fair view of the Movements of the Militia for a few days past
“Head Quarters, 1st. Brig. 3rd. Div. . Mi. Camp at , Septr. 15. 1838.
“Maj. Gen. , Commanding 3rd. Div. . Mi. Sir In pursuance of your orders, dated 11th. inst., I issued orders to Col. Wm. A. Dunn, commanding the 28th. Regiment, to raise four companies of mounted riflemen, consisting of fifty men each, also to Col John Boulware,— commanding the 70th. Regiment, to raise two Companies of mounted Riflemen, consisting each of like number, to start forthwith for service in the Counties of and , on the same day. Col Dunn obtained the four companies of volunteers required from the 28th. Regiment [p. 824]
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