History, 1838–1856, volume B-1 [1 September 1834–2 November 1838]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<September 25   letters> “Whatever may have been the disposition of the People called Mormons, before our arrival here,  since we have made our appearance they have shewn no disposition to resist the laws, or of hostile  intentions. There has been so much prejudice and exaggeration concerned in this matter,  that I found things entirely different from what I was prepared to expect— When we arrived  here, we found a large body of men from the Counties adjoining, armed and in the field, for  the purpose, as I learned, of assisting the people of this against the Mormons, without  being called out by the proper authorities— P.S. Since writing the above, I received  information that if the Committee do not agree, the determination of the men  is to drive the Mormons with Powder and lead”.
The same day wrote as follows.
“I am happy to be able  to state to you, that the deep excitement existing between the parties has in a great degree ceased  and so far I have had no occasion to resort to force, in assisting the Constables. On tomorrow,  a committee from meets a Committee of the Mormons at ,  <x> to propose to them to buy or sell, and I expect to be there <(p 7 Addenda note U)> On Saturday the 29th. inst, there are  fifteen or twenty of the Mormons cited to trial at , where, has pledged  himself to me, they will attend”
I was at home until eight o’clock, when I rode on horseback returned about 11 A M  and continued through the P.M. and evening
<Camp> The Camp passed through in Randolph County which has been appointed as  one of the Stakes of Zion, and is the ancient cite of the City of Manti and pitched tents at Dark  Creek, Salt Licks, seventeen miles It was reported to the Camp that one hundred  and ten men had volunteered from and gone to to settle difficulties
26 September 1838 • Wednesday
<26.> The Council informed the Camp that under <This morning Elder , one of the Councillors, proposed to the Council to break up the Camp, on account of> existing circumstances, so much excitement—  so many moving West and in large bodies too, it was wisdom for them to go to work,  and provide for their families, until the difficulties should be settled or they heard from  . Four of the seven Councillors were present, and three absent, Elder Young  had stopped by the way.
“Silence prevailed ............ Shortly it was manifest that it  was the desire of the Camp collectively to go forward, notwithstanding their due deference  always to the Will of the Lord through the Council. Elder [Duncan] Mc. Arthur said in a low  tone that it was his impression that we might go up in righteousness, keeping the  commandments, and not be molested. some others manifested the same in concurrence  with his feeling. Silence again ............. Here our faith was tried, and here the Lord  looked down and beheld us, and lo, a gentleman who was directly from and was  returning in his carriage to the East, where he belonged, left his carriage and came  among us, although we were a good distance from the Road and he told us that there  was no trouble in , and , but that we might go right  along without danger of running into any body’s difficulties, and further said he, the  one hundred and ten volunteers are to be discharged this day at twelve o’clock at Heattsville  The Council replied “We believe you Sir, and we thank you for your kindness” A vote of the  Camp was called for, whether we should proceed, & instantly all hands were raised toward heaven.!!!  Now once more be praise and glory and honor and power and might and dominion unto the Lord,  for he has over-ruled this thing, and he will overrule all things for his glory and the good of  those who love him and this man was his messenger. We of the Council did not know the Will  of the Lord as well before, as after this man’s information is perhaps better known to them  than to me, but I suppose it was because there was something wrong among them, that they  were not agreed, for it was their privilege to know the will and mind of the Lord. We  pursued our journey and in crossing a seven mile prairie we stopt in a hollow to bait the  teams and herd and here the volunteers passed us on their homeward bound passage according [p. 829]
September 25 letters “Whatever may have been the disposition of the People called Mormons, before our arrival here, since we have made our appearance they have shewn no disposition to resist the laws, or of hostile intentions. There has been so much prejudice and exaggeration concerned in this matter, that I found things entirely different from what I was prepared to expect— When we arrived here, we found a large body of men from the Counties adjoining, armed and in the field, for the purpose, as I learned, of assisting the people of this against the Mormons, without being called out by the proper authorities— P.S. Since writing the above, I received information that if the Committee do not agree, the determination of the men is to drive the Mormons with Powder and lead”.
The same day wrote as follows.
“I am happy to be able to state to you, that the deep excitement existing between the parties has in a great degree ceased and so far I have had no occasion to resort to force, in assisting the Constables. On tomorrow, a committee from meets a Committee of the Mormons at , x to propose to them to buy or sell, and I expect to be there (p 7 Addenda note U) On Saturday the 29th. inst, there are fifteen or twenty of the Mormons cited to trial at , where, has pledged himself to me, they will attend”
I was at home until eight o’clock, when I rode on horseback returned about 11 A M and continued through the P.M. and evening
Camp The Camp passed through in Randolph County which has been appointed as one of the Stakes of Zion, and is the ancient cite of the City of Manti and pitched tents at Dark Creek, Salt Licks, seventeen miles It was reported to the Camp that one hundred and ten men had volunteered from and gone to to settle difficulties
26 September 1838 • Wednesday
26. This morning Elder , one of the Councillors, proposed to the Council to break up the Camp, on account of existing circumstances, so much excitement— so many moving West and in large bodies too, it was wisdom for them to go to work, and provide for their families, until the difficulties should be settled or they heard from . Four of the seven Councillors were present, and three absent, Elder Young had stopped by the way.
“Silence prevailed ............ Shortly it was manifest that it was the desire of the Camp collectively to go forward, notwithstanding their deference always to the Will of the Lord through the Council. Elder Duncan Mc. Arthur said in a low tone that it was his impression that we might go up in righteousness, keeping the commandments, and not be molested. some others manifested the same in concurrence with his feeling. Silence again ............. Here our faith was tried, and here the Lord looked down and beheld us, and lo, a gentleman who was directly from and was returning to the East, where he belonged, left his carriage and came among us, although we were a good distance from the Road and he told us that there was no trouble in , and , but that we might go right along without danger of running into any body’s difficulties, and further said he, the one hundred and ten volunteers are to be discharged this day at twelve o’clock at Heattsville The Council replied “We believe you Sir, and we thank you for your kindness” A vote of the Camp was called for, whether we should proceed, & instantly all hands were raised toward heaven.!!! . We pursued our journey and in crossing a seven mile prairie we stopt in a hollow to bait the teams and herd and here the volunteers passed us on their homeward bound passage according [p. 829]
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