History, 1838–1856, volume B-1 [1 September 1834–2 November 1838]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 817
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27 August 1838 • Monday
<August 27> Monday 27. The Camp made out five furlongs and nine rods of turnpike and expect to start on the 28th. but deferred it till tomorrow
28 August 1838 • Tuesday
“(State of Missouri ) ss.
(County of )
<28> Before me, William Dryden, one of the Justices of the Peace of said , personally came , who being duly sworn according to Law, deposeth and saith: that on or about the 8th. day of August, 1838, in the County of , there came an armed force of men, said to be 154, to the best of my information and surrounded his house and family, and threatened him with instant death if he did not sign a certain instrument of writing, binding himself as a Justice of the Peace for said County of , not to molest the people called Mormons, and threatened the lives of myself and other— individuals, and did say they intended to make every Citizen sign such obligation, and further said they intended to have satisfaction for abuse they had received on Monday previous, and they would not submit to the laws; and further saith, that from the best information and his own personal knowledge, that , , Ephraim Owens, Harvey Umstead [Olmsted], , A. Brown, [HC 3:64] , , John Woods, H. Redfield, Riley Stuart, James Whitacre, Andrew Thor, Amos Tubbs, Dr. Gourze and Abram Nelson was guilty of aiding and abetting in commiting and perpetrating the above offence— Sworn to and subscribed this 28th. day of August 1838. W. Dryden Justice of the Peace of the County aforesaid”
This document with that of said of the Eighth of August shews him in his true light, a detestable unprincipled Mobocrat, and perjured Man—
29 August 1838 • Wednesday
<29> Wednesday 29. at three o clock the Trumpet of the Camp sounded, it being one hour earlier than usual to give time to prepare for the journey. every heart leaped for joy and even the children were so delighted, that they appeared like a lot of playful lambs. The divisions moved off 4. 3. 2. 1. (i.e.) in transposition, and at nine in the morning the encampment was vacated which had been occupied for one month. Elder Martin— H. Peck was left at Dayton, sick. The Brethren received the “credit of making their turnpike better than any other company. And that the whole Camp did not cause so much trouble in the neighborhood as two Irishmen who had worked in that place six weeks.” They passed through Montgomery into Jackson township, travelled Eighteen miles, and tented in the Road two hundred and seventy Miles from
30 August 1838 • Thursday
<30> Thursday 30. Camp travelling through Libertyville and Preble County seat, to the line of and Indiana and encamped within twenty rods of the place where the Camp tented, that went up to in 1834— two hundred and ninety two miles from . Elder Shumway’s child died.
This day issued the following order to
“Head Quarters of the Militia, Adjutant General’s Office August 30. 1838 Gen 3rd. Div. Mi[litia]. Sir:— Indications of Indian disturbances on our immediate frontier and the recent civil disturbances in the Counties of , and Carroll, render it necessary, as a precautionary measure, that an effective force of the Militia be held in readiness, to meet either contingency. The Commander in Chief, therefore orders, that you cause to be raised immediately, within the limits of your divison, to be held in readiness, and subject to further orders, four hundred mounted men, armed and equipped as infantry or riflemen, and formed into Companies according to law, under officers already in Commission.
The Commander in Chief suggests the propriety of your causing the above order to be carried into effect, in a manner calculated to produce as little excitement as possible, and report your proceedings to him through the Adjutant General— By order of the Commander in Chief. B. M. Lisle. Adjutant General a similar letter was also addressed to Major Generals , , David Willock, Lewis Bolton, Henry W. Crowther, and Thomas D. Grant.” [p. 817]
27 August 1838 • Monday
August 27
28 August 1838 • Tuesday
“(State of Missouri ) ss.
(County of )
28 Before me, William Dryden, one of the Justices of the Peace of said , personally came , who being duly sworn according to Law, deposeth and saith: that on or about the 8th. day of August, 1838, in the County of , there came an armed force of men, said to be 154, to the best of my information and surrounded his house and family, and threatened him with instant death if he did not sign a certain instrument of writing, binding himself as a Justice of the Peace for said County of , not to molest the people called Mormons, and threatened the lives of myself and other— individuals, and did say they intended to make every Citizen sign such obligation, and further said they intended to have satisfaction for abuse they had received on Monday previous, and they would not submit to the laws; and further saith, that from the best information and his own personal knowledge, that , , Ephraim Owens, Harvey Umstead [Olmsted], , A. Brown, [HC 3:64] , , John Woods, H. Redfield, Riley Stuart, James Whitacre, Andrew Thor, Amos Tubbs, Dr. Gourze and Abram Nelson was guilty of aiding and abetting in commiting and perpetrating the above offence— Sworn to and subscribed this 28th. day of August 1838. — W. Dryden Justice of the Peace of the County aforesaid”
This document with that of said of the Eighth of August shews him in his true light, a detestable unprincipled Mobocrat, and perjured Man—
29 August 1838 • Wednesday
29 Wednesday 29. at three o clock the Trumpet of the Camp sounded, it being one hour earlier than usual to give time to prepare for the journey. every heart leaped for joy and even the children were so delighted, that they appeared like a lot of playful lambs. The divisions moved off 4. 3. 2. 1. (i.e.) in transposition, and at nine in the morning the encampment was vacated which had been occupied for one month. Elder Martin— H. Peck was left at Dayton, sick. They passed through Montgomery into Jackson township, travelled Eighteen miles, and tented in the Road two hundred and seventy Miles from
30 August 1838 • Thursday
30 Thursday 30. Camp travelling through Libertyville and Preble County seat, to the line of and Indiana and encamped within twenty rods of the place where the Camp tented, that went up to in 1834— two hundred and ninety two miles from . Elder Shumway’s child died.
This day issued the following order to
“Head Quarters of the Militia, Adjutant General’s Office August 30. 1838 Gen 3rd. Div. Militia. Sir:— Indications of Indian disturbances on our immediate frontier and the recent civil disturbances in the Counties of , and Carroll, render it necessary, as a precautionary measure, that an effective force of the Militia be held in readiness, to meet either contingency. The Commander in Chief, therefore orders, that you cause to be raised immediately, within the limits of your divison, to be held in readiness, and subject to further orders, four hundred mounted men, armed and equipped as infantry or riflemen, and formed into Companies according to law, under officers already in Commission.
The Commander in Chief suggests the propriety of your causing the above order to be carried into effect, in a manner calculated to produce as little excitement as possible, and report your proceedings to him through the Adjutant General— By order of the Commander in Chief. B. M. Lisle. Adjutant General a similar letter was also addressed to Major Generals , , David Willock, Lewis Bolton, Henry W. Crowther, and Thomas D. Grant.” [p. 817]
Page 817