History, 1838–1856, volume B-1 [1 September 1834–2 November 1838]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 825
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<September 15> on the morning of the 12th., I took the command in person, and marched to the line of  at which point, I ordered the Colonels to march the Regiments to the timber on .  I then started for , the County Seat of , accompanied by my aid alone. On  arriving at that place I found , , and [William] McHaney, the prisoners mentioned in your  order. I demanded of the Guard, who had them in confinement, to deliver them over to me,  which was promptly done. I also found, that the guns that had been captured by the Sheriff  and Citizens of , had been distributed and placed in the hands of the soldiery  and scattered over the country; I ordered them to be immediately collected and delivered  up to me. I then sent an express to Col. Dunn to march the Regiment by daylight, for  that place, where he arrived about 7 o clock A.M. making forty miles since 10 o clock A.M.  on the previous day. When my command arrived, the guns were delivered up, amounting  to forty two stand three stand could not be produced, as they had probably gone to . I sent these guns under a guard, to your command in , together  with the prisoner , the other two being citizens of . I retained and brought  with me to this , and released them on parol of honor, as I conceived their  detention illegal. At 8 o clock A.M. I took up the line of March, and proceeded through  Mill Port, in , thirty seven miles from our former encampment, and  arrived at the Camp of the Citizens of and other adjoining Counties—  they amounted to between two and three hundred, as their commander, Dr. Austin  of Carroll informed me. Your order, requiring them to disperse, which had been  forwarded in advance of my command, by your aid, James M. Hughes, was read  to them, and they were required to disperse; they professed that their object for arming  and collecting was solely for defence, but they were marching and counter marching  guards out, and myself and others who approached the camp were taken to task,  and required to wait the approach of the Sergeant of the Guard. I had an  interview with Dr. Austin, and his professions were all pacific, but they still continue  in arms, marching and counter marching. I then proceeded with your aid, J. M,  Hughes, and my aid, Benj. Holliday, to the Mormon encampment, commanded by  Col. ; we held a conference with him, and he professed entire willingness to disband  and surrender up to me every one of the Mormons accused of crime, and required in return,  that the hostile forces, collected by the other Citizens of the County, should also disband. At the Camp  commanded by Dr. Austin, I demanded the Prisoner, demanded in your Order, who had been  released on the evening after my arrival in their vicinity. I took up line of March, and—  encamped in the direct road between the two hostile encampments, where I have remained  since, within about two and a half miles of s encampment, and some times the other  Camp is nearer, and sometimes further from me. I intend to occupy this position until  your arrival, as I deem it best to preserve peace, and prevent an engagement between the  parties, and if kept so for a few days, they will doubtless disband without coercion”. I have  the honor to be, yours with respect, Brig. Gen. 1st. Brig 3rd. Div, . Mi.”
By this it is clearly seen that the Officers and Troops acting under the s Orders,  had very little regard for the laws of the Land, otherwise , and McHaney  would not have been discharged by them. I was at and about home this day attending  to my business as usual—

15–16 September 1838 • Saturday–Sunday

<Camp> The Camp travelled twelve miles before breakfast, and pitched tents near Elder Keelers— there  was some contention among them, and brother Pierces child <died> this afternoon and was buried in  <16> the Camp Ground Sunday 16th. and held meeting in the afternoon had preaching and  breaking of bread—
I was at home all day with my family—

17 September 1838 • Monday

<17.> Monday 17 I was councilling with the brethren at home and about the City— [p. 825]
September 15 on the morning of the 12th., I took the command in person, and marched to the line of at which point, I ordered the Colonels to march the Regiments to the timber on . I then started for , the County Seat of , accompanied by my aid alone. On arriving at that place I found , , and William McHaney, the prisoners mentioned in your order. I demanded of the Guard, who had them in confinement, to deliver them over to me, which was promptly done. I also found, that the guns that had been captured by the Sheriff and Citizens of , had been distributed and placed in the hands of the soldiery and scattered over the country; I ordered them to be immediately collected and delivered up to me. I then sent an express to Col. Dunn to march the Regiment by daylight, for that place, where he arrived about 7 o clock A.M. making forty miles since 10 o clock A.M. on the previous day. When my command arrived, the guns were delivered up, amounting to forty two stand three stand could not be produced, as they had probably gone to . I sent these guns under a guard, to your command in , together with the prisoner , the other two being citizens of . I retained and brought with me to this , and released them on parol of honor, as I conceived their detention illegal. At 8 o clock A.M. I took up the line of March, and proceeded through Mill Port, in , thirty seven miles from our former encampment, and arrived at the Camp of the Citizens of and other adjoining Counties— they amounted to between two and three hundred, as their commander, Dr. Austin of Carroll informed me. Your order, requiring them to disperse, which had been forwarded in advance of my command, by your aid, James M. Hughes, was read to them, and they were required to disperse; they professed that their object for arming and collecting was solely for defence, but they were marching and counter marching guards out, and myself and others who approached the camp were taken to task, and required to wait the approach of the Sergeant of the Guard. I had an interview with Dr. Austin, and his professions were all pacific, but they still continue in arms, marching and counter marching. I then proceeded with your aid, J. M, Hughes, and my aid, Benj. Holliday, to the Mormon encampment, commanded by Col. ; we held a conference with him, and he professed entire willingness to disband and surrender up to me every one of the Mormons accused of crime, and required in return, that the hostile forces, collected by the other Citizens of the County, should also disband. At the Camp commanded by Dr. Austin, I demanded the Prisoner, demanded in your Order, who had been released on the evening after my arrival in their vicinity. I took up line of March, and— encamped in the direct road between the two hostile encampments, where I have remained since, within about two and a half miles of s encampment, and some times the other Camp is nearer, and sometimes further from me. I intend to occupy this position until your arrival, as I deem it best to preserve peace, and prevent an engagement between the parties, and if kept so for a few days, they will doubtless disband without coercion”. I have the honor to be, yours with respect, Brig. Gen. 1st. Brig 3rd. Div, . Mi.”
By this it is clearly seen that the Officers and Troops acting under the s Orders, had very little regard for the laws of the Land, otherwise , and McHaney would not have been discharged by them. I was at and about home this day attending to my business as usual—

15–16 September 1838 • Saturday–Sunday

Camp The Camp travelled twelve miles before breakfast, and pitched tents near Elder Keelers— there was some contention among them, and brother Pierces child died this afternoon and was buried in 16 the Camp Ground Sunday 16th. and held meeting in the afternoon had preaching and breaking of bread—
I was at home all day with my family—

17 September 1838 • Monday

17. Monday 17 I was councilling with the brethren at home and about the City— [p. 825]
Page 825