History, 1838–1856, volume B-1 [1 September 1834–2 November 1838]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 827
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<September 20  Camp—> had crossed in the Steam Boat and had quarrelled with some of the Camp before me. The  Spokesman asked me, “do you belong to this gang of Mormons?” “yes I do” said I. “are you a Mormon”  “Yes I am.” “Well stop,” “I am in too much hurry to be stopped and you have not power to stop  me” “Are you such a fool as to let those people lead you right into Danger?” “What Danger.” “Why  dont you know the Missourians are raising armies to cut you all to pieces.” “We dont fear  armies.” “God dam ye dont you fear me” said he at the same time making an attempt  to take his arms from his side, for he was armed with a brace of Pistols and a dirk.  “No I dont fear you any more than I do any other man” “Well God dam ye, what  do you fear?” “We fear nothing but God Almighty!” “Well stop! stop!! dam ye stop!!!  or Ill shoot you down.” “Well shoot if you like said I, and passed along while he kept  swearing he would shoot me, and said he, you will all get killed before you get up the bluff—”
I was at home until about ten o’clock, when I rode out on horse back. I returned  a little before Sunset and was at home through the evening.
<  Letter to > The following extracts from ’s letter to the of this date,  from , will give a pretty correct view of the army &c
“Sir— the Troops ordered out  for the purpose of putting down the insurrection, supposed to exist in the Counties of   and , were discharged on the 20th. inst, with the exception of two companies  of the Militia, now stationed in the County of , under the command of ; it was deemed necessary in the state of excitement in that , that  those companies should remain there for a short period longer, say some twenty days,  until confidence and tranquility should be restored. All the offenders against the  law, in that , against whom process was taken out, were arrested and brought before  a court of enquiry, and recognized to appear at the Circuit Court. Mr.  attended to the prosecuting on the part of the State. The Citizens of other Counties who  came in armed to the assistance of the Citizens of , have dispersed, and  returned to their respective homes, and the Mormons have also returned to their homes; so  that I consider the insurrection for the present, at least, to be at an end.
From the  best information I can get, there are about two hundred and fifty Mormon families in , nearly one half of the population, and the whole of the Mormon forces, in ,   and the adjoining counties, is estimated at from thirteen to fifteen hundred men,  capable of bearing arms.
The Mormons of , as I stated in a former  report, were encamped in a town called , and are headed by , a bold, brave, skilful, and I may add, a desperate man; they appeared to be acting  on the defensive, and I must further add, gave up the offenders with a good deal of promptness,  the Arms taken by the Mormons, and prisoners were also given up upon demand with seeming  cheerfulness.”
<x> The Mob again threatened

21 September 1838 • Friday

<21.> Friday 21st. I was about home—
<Camp> The Camp travelled seventeen miles. It rained much during the day. The Saints crowded  into their tents in their Wet Clothes and fasted till morning. The women and children  slept well and there was no complaint of “taking cold” on

22 September 1838 • Saturday

<22> Saturday 22 travelled eighteen miles and tented in a grove having to go half a mile after Water,  which was often the case.
I went out early in the morning returned to breakfast at half past seven and took an airing  on horse back at nine in the morning—
<Saints Petition  ret > The following petition is from the Saints at
Carroll County State of Missouri, Septr. 22. 1838 To his excellency .  Governor of the State of
Your Petitioners, Citizens of the County of Carroll, do [p. 827]
September 20 Camp— had crossed in the Steam Boat and had quarrelled with some of the Camp before me. The Spokesman asked me, “do you belong to this gang of Mormons?” “yes I do” said I. “are you a Mormon” “Yes I am.” “Well stop,” “I am in too much hurry to be stopped and you have not power to stop me” “Are you such a fool as to let those people lead you right into Danger?” “What Danger.” “Why dont you know the Missourians are raising armies to cut you all to pieces.” “We dont fear armies.” “God dam ye dont you fear me” said he at the same time making an attempt to take his arms from his side, for he was armed with a brace of Pistols and a dirk. “No I dont fear you any more than I do any other man” “Well God dam ye, what do you fear?” “We fear nothing but God Almighty!” “Well stop! stop!! dam ye stop!!! or Ill shoot you down.” “Well shoot if you like said I, and passed along while he kept swearing he would shoot me, and said he, you will all get killed before you get up the bluff—”
I was at home until about ten o’clock, when I rode out on horse back. I returned a little before Sunset and was at home through the evening.
Letter to The following extracts from ’s letter to the of this date, from , will give a pretty correct view of the army &c
“Sir— the Troops ordered out for the purpose of putting down the insurrection, supposed to exist in the Counties of and , were discharged on the 20th. inst, with the exception of two companies of the Militia, now stationed in the County of , under the command of ; it was deemed necessary in the state of excitement in that , that those companies should remain there for a short period longer, say some twenty days, until confidence and tranquility should be restored. All the offenders against the law, in that , against whom process was taken out, were arrested and brought before a court of enquiry, and recognized to appear at the Circuit Court. Mr. attended to the prosecuting on the part of the State. The Citizens of other Counties who came in armed to the assistance of the Citizens of , have dispersed, and returned to their respective homes, and the Mormons have also returned to their homes; so that I consider the insurrection for the present, at least, to be at an end.
From the best information I can get, there are about two hundred and fifty Mormon families in , nearly one half of the population, and the whole of the Mormon forces, in , and the adjoining counties, is estimated at from thirteen to fifteen hundred men, capable of bearing arms.
The Mormons of , as I stated in a former report, were encamped in a town called , and are headed by , a bold, brave, skilful, and I may add, a desperate man; they appeared to be acting on the defensive, and I must further add, gave up the offenders with a good deal of promptness, the Arms taken by the Mormons, and prisoners were also given up upon demand with seeming cheerfulness.”
x The Mob again threatened

21 September 1838 • Friday

21. Friday 21st. I was about home—
Camp The Camp travelled seventeen miles. It rained much during the day. The Saints crowded into their tents in their Wet Clothes and fasted till morning. The women and children slept well and there was no complaint of “taking cold” on

22 September 1838 • Saturday

22 Saturday 22 travelled eighteen miles and tented in a grove having to go half a mile after Water, which was often the case.
I went out early in the morning returned to breakfast at half past seven and took an airing on horse back at nine in the morning—
Saints Petition The following petition is from the Saints at
Carroll County State of Missouri, Septr. 22. 1838 To his excellency . Governor of the State of
Your Petitioners, Citizens of the County of Carroll, do [p. 827]
Page 827