History, 1838–1856, volume B-1 [1 September 1834–2 November 1838]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 796
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of our religion is the testimony of the apostles and prophets concern<May 8.>ing Jesus Christ, “that he died, was buried, and rose again the third day, and ascended up into heaven”; and all other things, are only appendages to these, which pertain to our religion. But in connection with these, we beleive in the gift of the Holy Ghost, the power of faith, the enjoyment of the Spiritual gifts according to the will of God, the restoration of the house of Israel, and the final triumph of truth.
I published the foregoing answers to save myself the trouble of repeating the same <x> a thousand times over, and over again.
9 May 1838 • Wednesday
<Wednesday 9.> Wednesday the 9th I attended the funeral of , and complied with the request that I should preach on the occasion.
10 May 1838 • Thursday
<10> Thursday 10th. I listened to an address on the political policy of ou[r] nation, delivered by , at the in the South west quarter of the city, to a large concourse of people from all sections of the , and from other counties also. Although was suffering under a severe cold, and great hoarseness. Yet, being assisted by the spirit of God. he was enabled clearly to elucidate the policy of the Federal and Democratic parties, from their rise to the in our country the present time, to the understanding of all present, giving an impartial hearing to both sides of the question. This address was delivered in consequence of a partial Electioneering, Federal speech of , at the same place a short time previous: And the politics of the church of [HC 3:30] Latter Day Saints generally being Democratic, it seemed desirable to hear an elucedation of the principles of both parties: with which I was highly edified.
11 May 1838 • Friday
<11.> Friday 11th. I attended the trial of . and Doctor McCord for transgression; before the Bishop’s Court. Mc Cord said he “was sorry to trouble the council on his account, for he had intended to withdraw from the church, before he left the place; that he had no confidence in the work of God, or his prophet, and should go his own way.” He gave up his licencence, and departed.— stated about the same as McCord, and that he had “no confidence in the heads of the church, beleiving they had transgressed, and had got out of the way: consequently he quit praying, and keeping the commandments, and indulged himself in his lustful desires; but when he heard that the first presidency had made a general settlement and acknowledged their sins, he began to pray again &c” When I interrogated him, he said he “had seen nothing out of the way himself, but he judged from heresay”
12 May 1838 • Saturday
<12> Saturday 12th. and myself attended the High Council for the purpose of presenting for their consideration, some business relating to our pecuniary concerns. We stated to the council our situation, as to maintaining our families, and the relation we now stand in to the church: spending, as we, have for eight years, our time, talents and property, in the service of the church; and being reduced, as it were to beggary, and being still detained in the business and [HC 3:31] service of the church, it appears necessary than something should be done for the support of our families, [p. 796]
of our religion is the testimony of the apostles and prophets concernMay 8.ing Jesus Christ, “that he died, was buried, and rose again the third day, and ascended up into heaven”; and all other things, are only appendages to these, which pertain to our religion. But in connection with these, we beleive in the gift of the Holy Ghost, the power of faith, the enjoyment of the Spiritual gifts according to the will of God, the restoration of the house of Israel, and the final triumph of truth.
I published the foregoing answers to save myself the trouble of repeating the same x a thousand times over, and over again.
9 May 1838 • Wednesday
Wednesday 9. Wednesday the 9th I attended the funeral of , and complied with the request that I should preach on the occasion.
10 May 1838 • Thursday
10 Thursday 10th. I listened to an address on the political policy of our nation, delivered by , at the in the South west quarter of the city, to a large concourse of people from all sections of the , and from other counties also. Although was suffering under a severe cold, and great hoarseness. Yet, being assisted by the spirit of God. he was enabled clearly to elucidate the policy of the Federal and Democratic parties, from their rise in our country the present time, to the understanding of all present, giving an impartial hearing to both sides of the question. This address was delivered in consequence of a partial Electioneering, Federal speech of , at the same place a short time previous: And the politics of the church of [HC 3:30] Latter Day Saints generally being Democratic, it seemed desirable to hear an elucedation of the principles of both parties: with which I was highly edified.
11 May 1838 • Friday
11. Friday 11th. I attended the trial of . and Doctor McCord for transgression; before the Bishop’s Court. Mc Cord said he “was sorry to trouble the council on his account, for he had intended to withdraw from the church, before he left the place; that he had no confidence in the work of God, or his prophet, and should go his own way.” He gave up his licencence, and departed.— stated about the same as McCord, and that he had “no confidence in the heads of the church, beleiving they had transgressed, and had got out of the way: consequently he quit praying, and keeping the commandments, and indulged himself in his lustful desires; but when he heard that the first presidency had made a general settlement and acknowledged their sins, he began to pray again &c” When I interrogated him, he said he “had seen nothing out of the way himself, but he judged from heresay”
12 May 1838 • Saturday
12 Saturday 12th. and myself attended the High Council for the purpose of presenting for their consideration, some business relating to our pecuniary concerns. We stated to the council our situation, as to maintaining our families, and the relation we now stand in to the church: spending, as we, have for eight years, our time, talents and property, in the service of the church; and being reduced, as it were to beggary, and being still detained in the business and [HC 3:31] service of the church, it appears necessary than something should be done for the support of our families, [p. 796]
Page 796