History, 1838–1856, volume B-1 [1 September 1834–2 November 1838]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 826
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<September 17  Camp> The Camp passed through Jacksonville in Morgan County to Geneva twenty five miles— There  was a small Church at Geneva and a few members in Jacksonville—
<’s letter> “Head Quarters, 3d. Div . Mi. Septr. 17. 1838. To his Excellency, the Commander in Chief—  Sir:— I arrived at the of this County, , on the evening of the 15th. inst: with the  troops raised from the Militia of , when I was joined by the troops from ,  under the command of ; in the same neighborhood I found from two to three  hundred men in arms, principally from the Counties of , Carroll and Saline; these  men were embodied under the pretext of defending the Citizens of , against  the Mormons, and were operating under the orders of a Dr. Austin from Carroll County.  The Citizens of , or a large portion of them residing on each side of the ,  had left their farms and removed their families either to the adjoining Counties or  collected them together at a place called the Camp Ground. The whole County on the  East side of appears to be deserted, with the exception of a few who are not  so timid as their neighbors. The Mormons of have also left their  farms, and have encamped for safety at a place, immediately on the East bank of  , called — The numbers are supposed to be about  two hundred and fifty men, citizens of , and from fifty to one hundred  men, Citizens of ; both parties have been scouting through the country,  and occasionally taking prisoners, and threatning and insulting each other, but as yet  no blood has been shed. I have ordered all armed men from adjoining Counties to  repair to their homes; the Men, and others to the amount of one  hundred men, have returned, and there remain now about one hundred and fifty  who will I am in hopes, return in a few days. I have been informed by the Mormons  that all of those who have been charged with a violation of the laws, will be in to day for  trial; when that is done, the troops under my command will be no longer required in this  county, if the Citizens of other counties will return to their respective homes. I have proposed  to leave two companies, of fifty men each, in this , and discharge the remainder of the  troops; said two companies will remain for the preservation of order, until peace and  confidence are restored. I also enclose to your Excellency the report of ,  and refer you for particulars to Major Rogers. I have the honor to be, your obt. servant Maj. Genl. 3 Div. . Mi.”

18 September 1838 • Tuesday

<18> Tuesday 18. I have been at home all day, considerably unwell but am some better this evening.
The Camp travelled to Brussels, Phillips Ferry fifteen miles, and a part crossed over  the Illinois River—
<’s Orders> This day the ordered Captain Childs to have the Boonville Guards mounted, with  ten days provisions and in readiness to march on his arrival at the end of the week— The   also ordered General of the fourth division to march immediately with four  hundred mounted men to the scene of difficulties and co-operate with General  Similar orders were issued to Major Generals Lewis Bolton, , and Thomas D. Grant—

19 September 1838 • Wednesday

<19.> Wednesday 19th. I was at and about home—
<Camp> The camp finished crossing the River and passing through Griggensville Griggsville and Pittsfield and  encamped on the Prairie, thirteen miles—

20 September 1838 • Thursday

<20> Thursday 20th. The Camp travelled twenty two miles crossing the on the Steamer  “Rescue” opposite Louisiana into Pike County Missouri, pitched tents one mile west of the Town—  twenty two miles 656 <miles> from . To shew a feeling that is striving to prevail throughout the State  of I give the following Extract from Elder John D. Tyler’s Journal from which most of the facts  in this history are derived.
“This afternoon as I was driving the herd, I had occasion to go back after a  Cow that strayed on the Prairie where we baited I found her and went on, and met two men who [p. 826]
September 17 Camp The Camp passed through Jacksonville in Morgan County to Geneva twenty five miles— There was a small Church at Geneva and a few members in Jacksonville—
’s letter “Head Quarters, 3d. Div . Mi. Septr. 17. 1838. To his Excellency, the Commander in Chief— Sir:— I arrived at the of this County, , on the evening of the 15th. inst: with the troops raised from the Militia of , when I was joined by the troops from , under the command of ; in the same neighborhood I found from two to three hundred men in arms, principally from the Counties of , Carroll and Saline; these men were embodied under the pretext of defending the Citizens of , against the Mormons, and were operating under the orders of a Dr. Austin from Carroll County. The Citizens of , or a large portion of them residing on each side of the , had left their farms and removed their families either to the adjoining Counties or collected them together at a place called the Camp Ground. The whole County on the East side of appears to be deserted, with the exception of a few who are not so timid as their neighbors. The Mormons of have also left their farms, and have encamped for safety at a place, immediately on the East bank of , called — The numbers are supposed to be about two hundred and fifty men, citizens of , and from fifty to one hundred men, Citizens of ; both parties have been scouting through the country, and occasionally taking prisoners, and threatning and insulting each other, but as yet no blood has been shed. I have ordered all armed men from adjoining Counties to repair to their homes; the Men, and others to the amount of one hundred men, have returned, and there remain now about one hundred and fifty who will I am in hopes, return in a few days. I have been informed by the Mormons that all of those who have been charged with a violation of the laws, will be in to day for trial; when that is done, the troops under my command will be no longer required in this county, if the Citizens of other counties will return to their respective homes. I have proposed to leave two companies, of fifty men each, in this , and discharge the remainder of the troops; said two companies will remain for the preservation of order, until peace and confidence are restored. I also enclose to your Excellency the report of , and refer you for particulars to Major Rogers. I have the honor to be, your obt. servant Maj. Genl. 3 Div. . Mi.”

18 September 1838 • Tuesday

18 Tuesday 18. I have been at home all day, considerably unwell but am some better this evening.
The Camp travelled to Brussels, Phillips Ferry fifteen miles, and a part crossed over the Illinois River—
’s Orders This day the ordered Captain Childs to have the Boonville Guards mounted, with ten days provisions and in readiness to march on his arrival at the end of the week— The also ordered General of the fourth division to march immediately with four hundred mounted men to the scene of difficulties and co-operate with General — Similar orders were issued to Major Generals Lewis Bolton, , and Thomas D. Grant—

19 September 1838 • Wednesday

19. Wednesday 19th. I was at and about home—
Camp The camp finished crossing the River and passing through Griggsville and Pittsfield and encamped on the Prairie, thirteen miles—

20 September 1838 • Thursday

20 Thursday 20th. The Camp travelled twenty two miles crossing the on the Steamer “Rescue” opposite Louisiana into Pike County Missouri, pitched tents one mile west of the Town— 656 miles from . To shew a feeling that is striving to prevail throughout the State of I give the following Extract from Elder John D. Tyler’s Journal from which most of the facts in this history are derived.
“This afternoon as I was driving the herd, I had occasion to go back after a Cow that strayed on the Prairie where we baited I found her and went on, and met two men who [p. 826]
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