History, 1838–1856, volume B-1 [1 September 1834–2 November 1838]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<September> as they had not had the privilege for some days, while some had died and others were sick  The Camp was instructed that they could not all go up to Zion in a body, but that it was  wisdom that some should look out places and stop through the Winter and work and get means  to help themselves with when they arrived, as the money received at Bath was growing  short; but the Seventies ought to go up and locate their families, and go forth and preach  the gospel—

10 September 1838 • Monday

<10> Monday 10th. There was a child born this morning in camp— son of Reuben Daniels.  nine or ten families concluded to look for a place and stop over winter— The camp passed  Independence and across fifteen mile prairie in all twenty two miles and encamped  by a small stream.
<Trial of &c> This day the Prisoners , William L. Mc. Haney and were  brought before , Justice of the Peace for examination— The Prisoners asked  for bail to allow time to get Council— The law allowed no bail, but the court adjourned  till Wednesday to give time to prisoners to get Council— After the arrest the facts  were communicated to by letter, asking his advice how to dispose of the  <’s letter> guns and prisoners— Under date of September Tenth  advised by letter to
“turn the prisoners loose, and let them receive kind treatment,  that the Guns were Government property in the care of Captain Pollard of his vicinity  but whether they went by his authority or permission he could not say,”
he was at a loss  to give any advice about them
“they shall not through any agency of mine be taken from  you to be converted and used for illegal purposes
(directed to Messrs. Smith  and ) Under the same date advised
“to send two  hundred or more men and dispel the forces in and all the assembled armed  forces in , and cause those Mormons who refuse to give up, to surrender and  be recognized, for it will not do to compromise the law with them.”—
What compromise  need there be, , for no Mormons had refused to surrender to the requisitions  of the law. It is mob violence alone that the Mormons are contending against— A Petition  was this day made out by Citizens of , directed to to
“call  out the Militia to suppress this insurrection in and and save the  effusion of blood which must speedily take place unless prevented”
signed by Jesse  Coates and twenty eight others—

11 September 1838 • Tuesday

<Camp 11> Tuesday 11th. The camp travelled sixteen miles across the Prairie and pitched tents  in Macon County—

12 September 1838 • Wednesday

<12> Wednesday 12. Camp travelled twenty nine miles 534 from
<Trial of > this day the Prisoners and his comrades were put upon trial. It was proven  to the Court that the guns were taken by one of the prisoners, and that they were taking  them to to arm the Mob. It was also proved that the Mob was collecting  for the purpose of driving the Saints from their homes. The Prisoners were held to bail  for their appearance at the Circuit Court, as principal, the others were hired  into his service—
<Petition to the > This day also a communication was made to , dated “” containing all the falsehoods and lies, that the evil  geniuses of Mobocrats Villains and Murderers could invent, charging the Mormons  with every crime they themselves had been guilty of, and calling the Mormons  “imposters rebels, Canadian refugees, Emissaries of the Prince of Darkness” &c signed  “the Citizens of and Counties”—
< to > Under this date , informed the by letter from Head Quarters  at , that on the solicitation of the Citizens and advice of the Judge of the  Circuit he had ordered out four companies of fifty men each from the Militia of   and a like number from : also four hundred men to hold— [p. 823]
September as they had not had the privilege for some days, while some had died and others were sick The Camp was instructed that they could not all go up to Zion in a body, but that it was wisdom that some should look out places and stop through the Winter and work and get means to help themselves with when they arrived, as the money received at Bath was growing short; but the Seventies ought to go up and locate their families, and go forth and preach the gospel—

10 September 1838 • Monday

10 Monday 10th. . nine or ten families concluded to look for a place and stop over winter— The camp passed Independence and across fifteen mile prairie in all twenty two miles and encamped by a small stream.
Trial of &c This day the Prisoners , William L. Mc. Haney and were brought before , Justice of the Peace for examination— The Prisoners asked for bail to allow time to get Council— The law allowed no bail, but the court adjourned till Wednesday to give time to prisoners to get Council— After the arrest the facts were communicated to by letter, asking his advice how to dispose of the ’s letter guns and prisoners— Under date of September Tenth advised by letter to
“turn the prisoners loose, and let them receive kind treatment, that the Guns were Government property in the care of Captain Pollard of his vicinity but whether they went by his authority or permission he could not say,”
he was at a loss to give any advice about them
“they shall not through any agency of mine be taken from you to be converted and used for illegal purposes
(directed to Messrs. Smith and ) Under the same date advised
“to send two hundred or more men and dispel the forces in and all the assembled armed forces in , and cause those Mormons who refuse to give up, to surrender and be recognized, for it will not do to compromise the law with them.”—
What compromise need there be, , for no Mormons had refused to surrender to the requisitions of the law. It is mob violence alone that the Mormons are contending against— A Petition was this day made out by Citizens of , directed to to
“call out the Militia to suppress this insurrection in and and save the effusion of blood which must speedily take place unless prevented”
signed by Jesse Coates and twenty eight others—

11 September 1838 • Tuesday

Camp 11 Tuesday 11th. The camp travelled sixteen miles across the Prairie and pitched tents in Macon County—

12 September 1838 • Wednesday

12 Wednesday 12. Camp travelled twenty nine miles 534 from
Trial of this day the Prisoners and his comrades were put upon trial. It was proven to the Court that the guns were taken by one of the prisoners, and that they were taking them to to arm the Mob. It was also proved that the Mob was collecting for the purpose of driving the Saints from their homes. The Prisoners were held to bail for their appearance at the Circuit Court, as principal, the others were hired into his service—
Petition to the This day also a communication was made to , dated “” containing all the falsehoods and lies, that the evil geniuses of Mobocrats Villains and Murderers could invent, charging the Mormons with every crime they themselves had been guilty of, and calling the Mormons “imposters rebels, Canadian refugees, Emissaries of the Prince of Darkness” &c signed “the Citizens of and Counties”—
to Under this date , informed the by letter from Head Quarters at , that on the solicitation of the Citizens and advice of the Judge of the Circuit he had ordered out four companies of fifty men each from the Militia of and a like number from : also four hundred men to hold— [p. 823]
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