History, 1838–1856, volume B-1 [1 September 1834–2 November 1838]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<October 25  s mob, battle  of > both thighs, one in the arm, all by musket shot. One had his arm broke by a sword— Brother   was shot in the head and left dead on the ground, so defaced the brethren  did not know him— reported that he lost one man— The three prisoners were  released and returned with the Brethren to was carried  some of the way in a litter but it caused so much distress he begged to be left and was  carried into Brother Winchester’s three miles from the city where he died that night.   died soon after, and ’s body was also brought from  when it was discovered who he was.
<  says he was not with  Joseph.   says it  was  who was with Joseph> I went with and  to meet the brethren on their return near Log Creek, where I saw in a  most distressed condition. His wound was incurable. Brother  was a very worthy man, beloved by all good men who knew him. He was one of the  Twelve Apostles, and died as he lived, a man of God; and strong in the faith of a  glorious Resurrection, in a world where mobs will have no power or place— one of  his last expressions to his Wife was “Whatever you do else O! do not defy <deny> the faith”—  How different his fate from that of the Apostate , who this day  vented all the lying spleen and malice of his heart towards the work of God in  a letter to Brother and Sister Abbott. To which was annexed an addenda by  
The following letter will shew the State of public feeling in the  Country
“Lexington 6 o’clock p.m. Octr. 25. 1838. To Messrs. and Wiley C.  Williams— “Gentlemen:— This letter is sent on after you on express, by Mr.  Bryant of , since you left this morning. Mr. C. R. Morehead came here on  express for men to assist in repelling a threatened attack upon to night.  He brought news that the Mormon armed force had attacked this  morning at daylight, and had cut off his whole company of fifty men. Since Mr.  Morehead left , one of the Company (’s) had come in and reported that  there were ten of his comrades killed, and the remainder were taken Prisoners, after many  of them had been severely wounded; he stated further, that would be sacked  and burned by the Mormon banditti to night. Nothing can exceed the consternation which  this news gives rise to. The women and children are flying from in every  direction. A number of them have repaired to Lexington, amongst whom is Mrs. Rees;  we will have sent from this County since 1 o clock this evening, about one hundred well  armed and daring men, perhaps the most effective our Country can boast of. They  will certainly give them (the Mormons) a warm reception at to night.  You will see the necessity of hurrying on to the City of Jefferson, and also of imparting  correct information to the public as you go along. My impression is, that you had  better send one of your number to Howard, Cooper and Boone Counties, in order that volunteers  may be getting ready, and flocking to the scene of trouble as fast as possible. They must  make haste and put a stop to the devastation which is menaced by these infuriated  fanatics, and they must go prepared and with the full determination to exterminate or  expel them from the State en masse. Nothing but this can give tranquility to the public  mind, and re-establish the supremacy of the laws. There must be no further delaying  with this question any where. The Mormons must leave the State, or we will—  one and all. And to this complexion it must come at last. We have great  reliance upon your ability, discretion and fitness for the task you have undertaken,  and we have only time to say, God speed you. Yours truly E. M. Ryland”
The  brethren had not thought of going to , it was a lie out of whole cloth—

26 October 1838 • Friday

<26> Friday 26.
Head Quarters of the Militia, City of Jefferson, Octr. 26. 1838— Gen.  1st. Div. Mo. Mi. Sir:— Application has been made to the Commander in Chief by the [p. 840]
October 25 s mob, battle of both thighs, one in the arm, all by musket shot. One had his arm broke by a sword— Brother was shot in the head and left dead on the ground, so defaced the brethren did not know him— reported that he lost one man— The three prisoners were released and returned with the Brethren to was carried some of the way in a litter but it caused so much distress he begged to be left and was carried into Brother Winchester’s three miles from the city where he died that night. died soon after, and ’s body was also brought from when it was discovered who he was.
says he was not with Joseph. says it was who was with Joseph I went with and to meet the brethren on their return near Log Creek, where I saw in a most distressed condition. His wound was incurable. Brother was a very worthy man, beloved by all good men who knew him. He was one of the Twelve Apostles, and died as he lived, a man of God; and strong in the faith of a glorious Resurrection, in a world where mobs will have no power or place— one of his last expressions to his Wife was “Whatever you do else O! do not deny the faith”— How different his fate from that of the Apostate , who this day vented all the lying spleen and malice of his heart towards the work of God in a letter to Brother and Sister Abbott. To which was annexed an addenda by
The following letter will shew the State of public feeling in the Country
“Lexington 6 o’clock p.m. Octr. 25. 1838. To Messrs. and Wiley C. Williams— “Gentlemen:— This letter is sent on after you on express, by Mr. Bryant of , since you left this morning. Mr. C. R. Morehead came here on express for men to assist in repelling a threatened attack upon to night. He brought news that the Mormon armed force had attacked this morning at daylight, and had cut off his whole company of fifty men. Since Mr. Morehead left , one of the Company (’s) had come in and reported that there were ten of his comrades killed, and the remainder were taken Prisoners, after many of them had been severely wounded; he stated further, that would be sacked and burned by the Mormon banditti to night. Nothing can exceed the consternation which this news gives rise to. The women and children are flying from in every direction. A number of them have repaired to Lexington, amongst whom is Mrs. Rees; we will have sent from this County since 1 o clock this evening, about one hundred well armed and daring men, perhaps the most effective our Country can boast of. They will certainly give them (the Mormons) a warm reception at to night. You will see the necessity of hurrying on to the City of Jefferson, and also of imparting correct information to the public as you go along. My impression is, that you had better send one of your number to Howard, Cooper and Boone Counties, in order that volunteers may be getting ready, and flocking to the scene of trouble as fast as possible. They must make haste and put a stop to the devastation which is menaced by these infuriated fanatics, and they must go prepared and with the full determination to exterminate or expel them from the State en masse. Nothing but this can give tranquility to the public mind, and re-establish the supremacy of the laws. There must be no further delaying with this question any where. The Mormons must leave the State, or we will— one and all. And to this complexion it must come at last. We have great reliance upon your ability, discretion and fitness for the task you have undertaken, and we have only time to say, God speed you. Yours truly E. M. Ryland”
The brethren had not thought of going to , it was a lie out of whole cloth—

26 October 1838 • Friday

26 Friday 26.
Head Quarters of the Militia, City of Jefferson, Octr. 26. 1838— Gen. 1st. Div. Mo. Mi. Sir:— Application has been made to the Commander in Chief by the [p. 840]
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