History, 1838–1856, volume B-1 [1 September 1834–2 November 1838]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 820
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<September 4> had previously agreed to volunteer, and try the case) to meet all at s near  the county line, in the Southern part of . I was at home in the evening after six o’clock.

5 September 1838 • Wednesday

<5> Wednesday 5th. I gave the following affidavit that the truth might appear before the Public in  the matter in controversy
<Affidavit of Joseph  Smith> “State of Missouri — } Ss— Before me , one  of the Justices of the County Court, within and for the County of aforesaid, personally  came, Joseph Smith Junr. who, being duly sworn according to law, deposeth and saith, that  on the seventh day of August 1838, being informed that an affray had taken place in , at the Election, in the Town of , in which two persons were killed, and one person  was badly wounded, and fled to the woods to save his life; all of which were said to be  persons belonging to the Society of the Church of Latter Day Saints. And further, said informant  stated that those persons who committed the outrage would not suffer the bodies of those who  had been killed to be taken off the ground and buried. These reports, with others, one of which  was that the Saints had not the privilege of voting at the polls as other Citizens— another was  that those opposed to the Saints were determined to drive them from <> County. And also  that they were arming and strengthning their forces and preparing for battle; and that  the Saints were preparing and making ready to stand in self defence. These reports having  excited the feelings of the Citizens of and vicinity. I was invited by  and some others, to go out to to the scene of these outrages; they having  previously determined to go out and learn the facts concerning said Reports. Accordingly  some of the Citizens, myself among the number, went out, two, three, and four in Companies  as they got ready. The reports and excitement continued until several of those  small Companies through the day were induced to follow the first; who were all  eager to learn the facts concerning this matter. We arrived in the evening at  the house of , about three miles from , the scene of the  reported outrages— here we learned the truth concerning the said affray, which had been  considerably exagerated; yet, there had been a serious outrage committed. We there learned  that the Mob was collected at Millport to a considerable number, and that  was at their head, and were to attack the Saints the next day, at the place we then were,  called ; this report we were inclined to believe might be true, as  this , who was said to be their leader, had been, but a few months before,  engaged in endeavoring to drive those of the Society who had settled in that vicinity, from  the . This had become notorious from the fact that said had personally ordered  several of the said Society to leave the . The next morning we despatched a Committee  to said ’s to ascertain the truth of these reports, and to know what his intentions were; and  as we understood he was a peace officer, we wished to know what we might expect from  him. They report that , instead of giving them any assurance of peace, insulted  them and gave them no satisfaction. Being desirous to know the feelings of  for myself, and being in want of good water, and understanding that there was none nearer  than ’s spring, myself, with several others mounted our horses and rode up to  ’s fence. with one or two others who had rode a-head, went into ’s  house, myself and some others went to the Spring for Water— I was shortly after sent for by and invited into the house, being introduced to . by , wished me to  be seated. We then commenced a conversation on the subject of the late difficulties, and present  excitement. I found quite hostile in his feelings towards the Saints; but he assured us  he did not belong to the Mob, neither would he take any part with them; but said he was  bound by his Oath to support the Constitution of the and the laws of the State of  . Deponent then asked him, if he would make said Statements in writing, so as to  refute the arguments of those who had affirmed that he () was one of the leaders of the  Mob. answered in the affirmative; accordingly he did so, which writing is in [p. 820]
September 4 had previously agreed to volunteer, and try the case) to meet all at s near the county line, in the Southern part of . I was at home in the evening after six o’clock.

5 September 1838 • Wednesday

5 Wednesday 5th. I gave the following affidavit that the truth might appear before the Public in the matter in controversy
Affidavit of Joseph Smith “State of Missouri — } Ss— Before me , one of the Justices of the County Court, within and for the County of aforesaid, personally came, Joseph Smith Junr. who, being duly sworn according to law, deposeth and saith, that on the seventh day of August 1838, being informed that an affray had taken place in , at the Election, in the Town of , in which two persons were killed, and one person was badly wounded, and fled to the woods to save his life; all of which were said to be persons belonging to the Society of the Church of Latter Day Saints. And further, said informant stated that those persons who committed the outrage would not suffer the bodies of those who had been killed to be taken off the ground and buried. These reports, with others, one of which was that the Saints had not the privilege of voting at the polls as other Citizens— another was that those opposed to the Saints were determined to drive them from County. And also that they were arming and strengthning their forces and preparing for battle; and that the Saints were preparing and making ready to stand in self defence. These reports having excited the feelings of the Citizens of and vicinity. I was invited by and some others, to go out to to the scene of these outrages; they having previously determined to go out and learn the facts concerning said Reports. Accordingly some of the Citizens, myself among the number, went out, two, three, and four in Companies as they got ready. The reports and excitement continued until several of those small Companies through the day were induced to follow the first; who were all eager to learn the facts concerning this matter. We arrived in the evening at the house of , about three miles from , the scene of the reported outrages— here we learned the truth concerning the said affray, which had been considerably exagerated; yet, there had been a serious outrage committed. We there learned that the Mob was collected at Millport to a considerable number, and that was at their head, and were to attack the Saints the next day, at the place we then were, called ; this report we were inclined to believe might be true, as this , who was said to be their leader, had been, but a few months before, engaged in endeavoring to drive those of the Society who had settled in that vicinity, from the . This had become notorious from the fact that said had personally ordered several of the said Society to leave the . The next morning we despatched a Committee to said ’s to ascertain the truth of these reports, and to know what his intentions were; and as we understood he was a peace officer, we wished to know what we might expect from him. They report that , instead of giving them any assurance of peace, insulted them and gave them no satisfaction. Being desirous to know the feelings of for myself, and being in want of good water, and understanding that there was none nearer than ’s spring, myself, with several others mounted our horses and rode up to ’s fence. with one or two others who had rode a-head, went into ’s house, myself and some others went to the Spring for Water— I was shortly after sent for by and invited into the house, being introduced to . by , wished me to be seated. We then commenced a conversation on the subject of the late difficulties, and present excitement. I found quite hostile in his feelings towards the Saints; but he assured us he did not belong to the Mob, neither would he take any part with them; but said he was bound by his Oath to support the Constitution of the and the laws of the State of . Deponent then asked him, if he would make said Statements in writing, so as to refute the arguments of those who had affirmed that he () was one of the leaders of the Mob. answered in the affirmative; accordingly he did so, which writing is in [p. 820]
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