History, 1838–1856, volume B-1 [1 September 1834–2 November 1838]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 839
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<October 24> give us assistance as quick as possible— Yours &c — Joseph Dickson”
These mobbers  must have had very acute ears to hear Cannon (a six pounder) thirty seven miles— so much  for the lies of a priest of this world— Now for the truth of the case. This day about  < at Log Creek> noon , with some thirty or forty men, called on Brother Thoret Parsons  where he was living at the head of the East branch at Log Creek, and warned <him> to be gone  before next day at ten in the morning, declaring also
“That he would give Thunder  and Lightening before next day at noon, if he had good luck in meeting , who  would camp about six miles west of that night, and that he should camp on  ,”
and departed towards . Brother Parsons despatched a Messenger  with this news to , and followed after to watch his movements. Brother  <David Judith  this christian name  furnished by  Elias Smith says  it is D Juda> , and <David> Judith who went out this morning to watch the movements of the  enemy, saw eight unarmed mobbers call at the house of Brother <Mr> Pinkham, where they took three  prisoners (Brother <Nathan> Pinkham’s son, Brothers Wm. Seeley and <Addison> Green) and four horses, arms &c and  departed threatning <Father> Pinkham if he did not leave the State immediately they “would have  his damned old scalp,” and having learned of ’s movements returned to  near midnight, and reported their proceedings, and that of the Mob. On hearing the  <’s order> Report the first Judge of the Ordered , the  highest officer in command in , to send out a Company to disperse the Mob  and retake their Prisoners who it was reported they intended to murder that night—  The Trumpet sounded, and the brethren were assembled on the public square— about  midnight when the facts were stated and about seventy five volunteered to obey the Judges  order under command of Captain , who immediately commenced their  March on horseback, hoping to surprise and scatter the Camp, retake the prisoners and  prevent the attack threatened upon , without the loss of blood.

25 October 1838 • Thursday

<25> Thursday 25. fifteen of the Company were detached from the Main body while Sixty  continued their March till they arrived near the fords of (or Creek) where they  dismounted, tied their horses, and leaving four or five men to guard them, proceeded toward  the Ford, not knowing the location of the encampment. It was just at the dawning of light  in the East, when they were marching quietly along the Road, and near the top of the hill  <s mob  battle at > which descends to the River, when the report of a Gun was heard, and young <Young  ’s  name was  — this  name was furnished  by >  reeled out of the Ranks and fell mortally wounded. Thus the work of death commenced,  when ordered a charge and rushed down the hill on a fast trot, and  when within about fifty yards of the Camp formed a line. The mob formed a line  under the bank of the River below their tents. It was yet so dark that little could  be seen by looking at the West— while the mob looking towards the dawning light could  see and his men, when they fired a broadside, and three or four of the brethren  fell— ordered the fire returned, which was instantly obeyed to great—  disadvantage in the darkness which yet continued— The fire was repeated by the Mob  and returned by ’s Company, and gave the Watchword “God and Liberty”;  when ordered a charge which was instantly obeyed— The parties immediately  came in contact with their swords, and the Mob was soon put to flight, crossing the  River at the Ford and such places as they could get a chance. In the pursuit  one of the Mob fled behind a tree, wheeled, and shot , who instantly  fell mortally wounded, having received a large ball in his bowels— The ground  was soon cleared, and the brethren gathered up a waggon or two, and making beds therein  of tents &c took their wounded and retreated towards — Three brethren were  wounded in the bowels, one in the neck, one in the Shoulder, one through the hips, one through [p. 839]
October 24 give us assistance as quick as possible— Yours &c — Joseph Dickson”
These mobbers must have had very acute ears to hear Cannon (a six pounder) thirty seven miles— so much for the lies of a priest of this world— Now for the truth of the case. This day about at Log Creek noon , with some thirty or forty men, called on Brother Thoret Parsons where he was living at the head of the East branch at Log Creek, and warned him to be gone before next day at ten in the morning, declaring also
“That he would give Thunder and Lightening before next day at noon, if he had good luck in meeting , who would camp about six miles west of that night, and that he should camp on ,”
and departed towards . Brother Parsons despatched a Messenger with this news to , and followed after to watch his movements. Brother David Judith this christian name furnished by Elias Smith says it is D Juda , and David Judith who went out this morning to watch the movements of the enemy, saw eight unarmed mobbers call at the house of Brother Pinkham, where they took three prisoners ( Nathan Pinkham , Brothers Wm. Seeley and Addison Green) and four horses, arms &c and departed threatning Father Pinkham if he did not leave the State immediately they “would have his damned old scalp,” and having learned of ’s movements returned to near midnight, and reported their proceedings, and that of the Mob. On hearing the ’s order Report the first Judge of the Ordered , the highest officer in command in , to send out a Company to disperse the Mob and retake their Prisoners who it was reported they intended to murder that night— The Trumpet sounded, and the brethren were assembled on the public square— about midnight when the facts were stated and about seventy five volunteered to obey the Judges order under command of Captain , who immediately commenced their March on horseback, hoping to surprise and scatter the Camp, retake the prisoners and prevent the attack threatened upon , without the loss of blood.

25 October 1838 • Thursday

25 Thursday 25. fifteen of the Company were detached from the Main body while Sixty continued their March till they arrived near the fords of (or Creek) where they dismounted, tied their horses, and leaving four or five men to guard them, proceeded toward the Ford, not knowing the location of the encampment. It was just at the dawning of light in the East, when they were marching quietly along the Road, and near the top of the hill s mob battle at which descends to the River, when the report of a Gun was heard, and young Young ’s name was — this name was furnished by reeled out of the Ranks and fell mortally wounded. Thus the work of death commenced, when ordered a charge and rushed down the hill on a fast trot, and when within about fifty yards of the Camp formed a line. The mob formed a line under the bank of the River below their tents. It was yet so dark that little could be seen by looking at the West— while the mob looking towards the dawning light could see and his men, when they fired a broadside, and three or four of the brethren fell— ordered the fire returned, which was instantly obeyed to great— disadvantage in the darkness which yet continued— The fire was repeated by the Mob and returned by ’s Company, and gave the Watchword “God and Liberty”; when ordered a charge which was instantly obeyed— The parties immediately came in contact with their swords, and the Mob was soon put to flight, crossing the River at the Ford and such places as they could get a chance. In the pursuit one of the Mob fled behind a tree, wheeled, and shot , who instantly fell mortally wounded, having received a large ball in his bowels— The ground was soon cleared, and the brethren gathered up a waggon or two, and making beds therein of tents &c took their wounded and retreated towards — Three brethren were wounded in the bowels, one in the neck, one in the Shoulder, one through the hips, one through [p. 839]
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