History, 1838–1856, volume B-1 [1 September 1834–2 November 1838]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 559
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<November 25.> 3. And again, verily I say unto you, there was joy in heaven  when my servant bowed to my scepter and seperated  himself from the crafts of men; therefore, blessed is my servant  , for I will have mercy on him, and notwithstanding  the vanity of his heart I will lift him up inasmuch as he  will humble himself before me; and I will give him  grace and assurance wherewith he may stand; and if  he continues to be a faithful witness and a light unto the  church, I have prepared a crown for him in the mansions  of my Father; even so: amen.
The same day, Hon. J. T. V. Thompson, state Senator wrote , at . as follows.
<J. T. V. Thompson’s  Letter to .> “Jefferson City.” Dear Sir, I will say to  you that your case with the people has been mentioned to  the highest officer of the State, the . He speaks of it in his  message, and so much of his message will be referred to a com mittee. I am not able to say what will be their report, but I  will write you again.. I have the honor &c. J. T. V. Thompson.”
The following is that portion if the ’s Message referred to in  the foregoing letter.
<Extract from the  Governor’s Message> “In July, 1833, a large portion of the citizens of   organized themselves, and entered in resolutions  to expel from that county, a religious sect called Mormons,  who had become obnoxious to them. In November following they  effected their object, not however without the loss of several  lives. In the judicial enquiry into these outrages, the civil  authorities who had cognizance of them, deemed it proper  to have a military guard for the purpose of giving protection  during the progress of the trials. This was ordered, and the  Attorney General was requested to give his attention during  the investigation, both of which were performed, but all  to no purpose. As yet none have been punished for these  outrages, and it is believed that under our present laws,  conviction for any violence committed against a Mormon , cannot be had in . These unfortunate  people are now forbidden to take possession of their homes;  and the principal part of them, I am informed, are at  this time living in an adjoining county, in a great  measure, upon the charity of its citizens. It is for you  to determine what amendments the laws may require so as  to guard against such acts of violence for the future.”

28 November 1834 • Friday

<28.  Minutes of  a council> “ November 28th” Minutes of a council. “A council  convened this evening, to transact business according to the reg ulations of the church. Joseph Smith Junr and , presiding. eight counsellors present. and were appointed to speak.
<Letter from the  Church in ,  acted upon> A letter from the church in , Essex County, New York,  was presented by brethren and  and read by the , said letter contained an account  of money and other property, sent by the church in , [p. 559]
November 25. 3. And again, verily I say unto you, there was joy in heaven when my servant bowed to my scepter and seperated himself from the crafts of men; therefore, blessed is my servant , for I will have mercy on him, and notwithstanding the vanity of his heart I will lift him up inasmuch as he will humble himself before me; and I will give him grace and assurance wherewith he may stand; and if he continues to be a faithful witness and a light unto the church, I have prepared a crown for him in the mansions of my Father; even so: amen.
The same day, Hon. J. T. V. Thompson, state Senator wrote , at . as follows.
J. T. V. Thompson’s Letter to . “Jefferson City.” Dear Sir, I will say to you that your case with the people has been mentioned to the highest officer of the State, the . He speaks of it in his message, and so much of his message will be referred to a committee. I am not able to say what will be their report, but I will write you again.. I have the honor &c. J. T. V. Thompson.”
The following is that portion if the ’s Message referred to in the foregoing letter.
Extract from the Governor’s Message “In July, 1833, a large portion of the citizens of organized themselves, and entered in resolutions to expel from that county, a religious sect called Mormons, who had become obnoxious to them. In November following they effected their object, not however without the loss of several lives. In the judicial enquiry into these outrages, the civil authorities who had cognizance of them, deemed it proper to have a military guard for the purpose of giving protection during the progress of the trials. This was ordered, and the Attorney General was requested to give his attention during the investigation, both of which were performed, but all to no purpose. As yet none have been punished for these outrages, and it is believed that under our present laws, conviction for any violence committed against a Mormon, cannot be had in . These unfortunate people are now forbidden to take possession of their home; and the principal part of them, I am informed, are at this time living in an adjoining county, in a great measure, upon the charity of its citizens. It is for you to determine what amendments the laws may require so as to guard against such acts of violence for the future.”

28 November 1834 • Friday

28. Minutes of a council “ November 28th” Minutes of a council. “A council convened this evening, to transact business according to the regulations of the church. Joseph Smith Junr and , presiding. eight counsellors present. and were appointed to speak.
Letter from the Church in , acted upon A letter from the church in , Essex County, New York, was presented by brethren and and read by the , said letter contained an account of money and other property, sent by the church in , [p. 559]
Page 559