History, 1838–1856, volume B-1 [1 September 1834–2 November 1838]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<October 29.  Minutes of Council.> was, that “the complaint was not without foundation, yet,  the charge has not been fully sustained, but he has acted inju diciously, and brought a disgrace upon himself, his daughter,  and upon this church, because he ought to have trained his child  in a way, that she should not have required the rod at the age  of fifteen years. made his confession and was for given. Sister Elliot confessed her wrong and promised to do so  < & Sister Elliot  restored to fellowship.> no more, consequently the council forgave her; and they were  both restored to fellowship:”

30 October 1835 • Friday

<30.> Friday 30 at home. Mr Francis Porter from , N. York.  <Queries of Francis  Porter.> a member of the Methodist church called to make some inquiry,  about lands in this place () whether there are any valueable  farms for sale, and whether a member of our church could move  into this vicinity, and purchase lands, and enjoy his own pos sessions and property without making it common Stock. He had  been requested to do so by some brethren who live in the town  <Answer> of Leroy, New York. I replied that I had a valuable farm joining  the Temple Lot, I would sell; and that there are other lands for sale  in this place; and that we have no common stock business  among us; that every man enjoys his own property, or can if he  choose is disposed, consecrate liberally or illiberally to the support  of the poor and needy, or the building up of Zion. He also enquir ed how many members there are in this church. I told him there  were about five or six hundred who communed at our chapel,  and perhaps a thousand in this vicinity. At evening I was  <Letter from .> presented with a letter from Brother , the purport of  which is, that he is censured by the brethren, on account of what  took place at the council last night, and wishes to have the  matter settled to the understanding of all, that he may not be  censured unjustly, considering that his cause was a just one,  and that he had been materially injured. I replied that I  <Answer to ’s.  Letter.> thought we parted with the best of feelings, that I am not to  blame on account of the dissatisfaction of others. I invited him  to call and talk with me, and that I would talk with  him in the spirit of meekness, and give him all the satis faction I could. This reply was by letter, copy retained.

31 October 1835 • Saturday

<31.> Saturday 31st. in the morning Brother came in  < came in> and said he had been much troubled all night and had  not slept any, that something was wrong. While talking Brother  < came in.> came in according to my request last night.  said that he must go to the store. I invited him to stay. He said  he would go and do his business, and return; He did so.  While he was gone introduced the subject  of our difficulty at the council. I told him I did not  want to converse upon the subject, until returned.  <Proposition.> He soon came in; I then pre proposed to relate the occurrence  of the council before named, and wherein I had been out  of the way I would confess it, and ask his forgiveness; [p. 632]
October 29. Minutes of Council. was, that “the complaint was not without foundation, yet, the charge has not been fully sustained, but he has acted injudiciously, and brought a disgrace upon himself, his daughter, and upon this church, because he ought to have trained his child in a way, that she should not have required the rod at the age of fifteen years. made his confession and was forgiven. Sister Elliot confessed her wrong and promised to do so & Sister Elliot restored to fellowship. no more, consequently the council forgave her; and they were both restored to fellowship:”

30 October 1835 • Friday

30. Friday 30 at home. Mr Francis Porter from , N. York. Queries of Francis Porter. a member of the Methodist church called to make some inquiry, about lands in this place () whether there are any valueable farms for sale, and whether a member of our church could move into this vicinity, and purchase lands, and enjoy his own possessions and property without making it common Stock. He had been requested to do so by some brethren who live in the town Answer of Leroy, New York. I replied that I had a valuable farm joining the Temple Lot, I would sell; and that there are other lands for sale in this place; and that we have no common stock business among us; that every man enjoys his own property, or can if he is disposed, consecrate liberally or illiberally to the support of the poor and needy, or the building up of Zion. He also enquired how many members there are in this church. I told him there were about five or six hundred who communed at our chapel, and perhaps a thousand in this vicinity. At evening I was Letter from . presented with a letter from Brother , the purport of which is, that he is censured by the brethren, on account of what took place at the council last night, and wishes to have the matter settled to the understanding of all, that he may not be censured unjustly, considering that his cause was a just one, and that he had been materially injured. I replied that I Answer to ’s. Letter. thought we parted with the best of feelings, that I am not to blame on account of the dissatisfaction of others. I invited him to call and talk with me, and that I would talk with him in the spirit of meekness, and give him all the satisfaction I could. This reply was by letter, .

31 October 1835 • Saturday

31. Saturday 31st. in the morning Brother came in came in and said he had been much troubled all night and had not slept any, that something was wrong. While talking Brother came in. came in according to my request last night. said that he must go to the store. I invited him to stay. He said he would go and do his business, and return; He did so. While he was gone introduced the subject of our difficulty at the council. I told him I did not want to converse upon the subject, until returned. Proposition. He soon came in; I then proposed to relate the occurrence of the council before named, and wherein I had been out of the way I would confess it, and ask his forgiveness; [p. 632]
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