History, 1838–1856, volume B-1 [1 September 1834–2 November 1838]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<August> Clubs, Pistols, Dirks, Knives and some Guns, cursing and swearing— The Brethren not having  arms, thought it wisdom to return to their farms, collect their families, and hide them in a  thicket of hazle brush, which they did, and stood sentry around them, through the night while  the women and children lay on the ground in the rain

7 August 1838 • Tuesday

<August 7> Tuesday morning a report came to , by way of those not belonging to the Church that  at the Election at yesterday two or three of our brethren were killed by the Missourians  and left upon the ground, and not suffered to be interred, that the brethren were prevented from  voting and a majority of the Inhabitants of were determined to drive the Saints  <Joseph starts for  > from the county— on hearing this report, I started for to assist the brethren, accompanied  by , and fifteen or twenty others, who were armed for their  own protection, and the command was given to , a Colonel in the Militia  on our way we were joined by the brethren from different parts of the Country, some of whom  were attacked by the Mob, but we all reached ’s that night in safety, where we  found some of the brethren who were mobbed at , with others, waiting for our Counsel  Here we received the cheering intelligence that none of the brethren were killed, although several  were badly wounded— From the best information about one hundred and fifty Missourians  warred against from six to twelve of our brethren who fought like Lions— Several Missourians  had their skulls cracked— blessed be the memory of those few brethren who contended so  strenuously for their Constitutional rights, and religious freedom, against such an—  overwhelming force of desperadoes.

8 August 1838 • Wednesday

<Wednesday 8.> After spending the night in Council at s I rode out with some of the Brethren  to view the situation of affairs in that region, and among others called on  Justice of the Peace, and Judge elect for , who had some time previous sold his  Farm to Brother , and received part pay according to Agreement, and  afterwards united himself with a band of Mobbers to drive the Saints from, and prevent  their settling in — On interrogation he confessed what he had done, and in consequence  of this violation of his Oath as Magistrate, we asked him to give us some satisfaction so that we  might know whether he was our friend or enemy, whether he would administer the Law in  Justice, and politely requested him to sign an Agreement of Peace, but being jealous, he would  not sign it but said he would write one himself to our satisfaction and sign it, which  he did as follows
<’s  agreement> <see original  Documents and  make corrections  if necessary> “I , a justice of the peace of , do hereby sertify  to the people coled Mormin, that he is bound to suport the constitution of this State, and of the  , and he is not attached to any Mob nor will not attach himself to any such people.  And so long as they will not molest me, I will not molest them. This the 8th. day of august 1838.   J.P.”
hoping he would abide his own decision and support the Law, we left  him in peace and returned to ’s at . In the evening some of  the Citizens from Mill Port called on us and we agreed to meet some of the principle men of the  County in Council, at the next day at twelve noon.
<Camp> The Camp still continued their labors in , many were sick and evil Spirits were striving  to trouble the brethren, Elders , Carter, Knights, Pettingil, Brown and Perry spent the  evening in walking through the tents rebuking diseases and foul spirits and standing between the  Saints and the destroyer. Brother Boynton’s child died, and many were healed.

9 August 1838 • Thursday

<Thursday 9.  Agreement for Peace  at .> The Committee assembled at at twelve according to previous appointment  viz, on the part of the Citizens , Senator elect, , Representative elect,   Clerk of the Circuit Court, and others; on the part of the Saints, ,  , , and others. At this meeting both parties entered  into a covenant of peace, to preserve each others rights, and stand in their defence; that if men  should do wrong, neither party should uphold them or endeavor to screen them from justice [p. 813]
August Clubs, Pistols, Dirks, Knives and some Guns, cursing and swearing— The Brethren not having arms, thought it wisdom to return to their farms, collect their families, and hide them in a thicket of hazle brush, which they did, and stood sentry around them, through the night while the women and children lay on the ground in the rain

7 August 1838 • Tuesday

August 7 Tuesday morning a report came to , by way of those not belonging to the Church that at the Election at yesterday two or three of our brethren were killed by the Missourians and left upon the ground, and not suffered to be interred, that the brethren were prevented from voting and a majority of the Inhabitants of were determined to drive the Saints Joseph starts for from the county— on hearing this report, I started for to assist the brethren, accompanied by , and fifteen or twenty others, who were armed for their own protection, and the command was given to , on our way we were joined by the brethren from different parts of the Country, some of whom were attacked by the Mob, but we all reached ’s that night in safety, where we found some of the brethren who were mobbed at , with others, waiting for our Counsel Here we received the cheering intelligence that none of the brethren were killed, although several were badly wounded— From the best information about one hundred and fifty Missourians warred against from six to twelve of our brethren who fought like Lions— Several Missourians had their skulls cracked— blessed be the memory of those few brethren who contended so strenuously for their Constitutional rights, and religious freedom, against such an— overwhelming force of desperadoes.

8 August 1838 • Wednesday

Wednesday 8. After spending the night in Council at s I rode out with some of the Brethren to view the situation of affairs in that region, and among others called on Justice of the Peace, and Judge elect for , who had some time previous sold his Farm to Brother , and received part pay according to Agreement, and afterwards united himself with a band of Mobbers to drive the Saints from, and prevent their settling in — On interrogation he confessed what he had done, and in consequence of this violation of his Oath as Magistrate, we asked him to give us some satisfaction so that we might know whether he was our friend or enemy, whether he would administer the Law in Justice, and politely requested him to sign an Agreement of Peace, but being jealous, he would not sign it but said he would write one himself to our satisfaction and sign it, which he did as follows
’s agreement see original Documents and make corrections if necessary “I , a justice of the peace of , do hereby sertify to the people coled Mormin, that he is bound to suport the constitution of this State, and of the , and he is not attached to any Mob nor will not attach himself to any such people. And so long as they will not molest me, I will not molest them. This the 8th. day of august 1838. J.P.”
hoping he would abide his own decision and support the Law, we left him in peace and returned to ’s at . In the evening some of the Citizens from Mill Port called on us and we agreed to meet some of the principle men of the County in Council, at the next day at twelve noon.
Camp The Camp still continued their labors in , many were sick and evil Spirits were striving to trouble the brethren, Elders , Carter, Knights, Pettingil, Brown and Perry spent the evening in walking through the tents rebuking diseases and foul spirits and standing between the Saints and the destroyer. Brother Boynton’s child died, and many were healed.

9 August 1838 • Thursday

Thursday 9. Agreement for Peace at . The Committee assembled at at twelve according to previous appointment viz, on the part of the Citizens , Senator elect, , Representative elect, Clerk of the Circuit Court, and others; on the part of the Saints, , , , and others. At this meeting both parties entered into a covenant of peace, to preserve each others rights, and stand in their defence; that if men should do wrong, neither party should uphold them or endeavor to screen them from justice [p. 813]
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