History, 1838–1856, volume B-1 [1 September 1834–2 November 1838]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<October 10th.> but instead of receiving any aid or even sympathy, from his Excellency, we were told that  “the quarrel was between the Mormons and the Mob,” and that “we might fight it out” About this  time a mob commanded by Hiram Standly took ’s goods out of his house,  <Mob at > and said Standly set fire to ’s house and burned it before his eyes. and ordered  him to leave <the place> forthwith, which he did by fleeing from to . The mob  had sent to and got a cannon, powder and balls, and bodies of armed men  had gathered in to aid them from , Saline, Howard, , Clinton, , Platt and  other parts of the State, and a man by the name of Jackson from Howard County  was appointed their leader— The Saints were forbid to go out of the City <Town> under  pain of death, and were shot at when they attempted to go out to get food of—  which they were destitute. As fast as their Cattle, horses or other property got where  the Mob could get hold of it, it was taken as spoil. By these outrages the brethren  were obliged, most of them to live in waggons or tents, application had been made  to the judge of the circuit court for protection, who ordered out two companies of  Militia one commanded by , a Methodist priest and Mobocrat of  the deepest die, the whole under the command of , another Mobber,  if his letters speak his feelings. and his actions did not belie him, for he never  made the first attempt to disperse the Mob, and when asked the reason of  his conduct, he always replied that and his Company were mutinous  and mobocratic, that he dare not attempt a dispersion of the Mob. Two other  principal men of the mob were Major Ashby Member of the Legislature and a Presbyterian Clergyman. informed us that a greater  part of his men under had mutinied, and that he should be obliged  to draw them off from the place, for fear they would join the Mob: consequently he  could offer us no assistance. We had now no hopes whatever, of successfully resisting  the Mob, who kept constantly increasing: our provisions were entirely exhausted and  we being wearied out, by continually standing on guard, and watching the movements  of our enemies; who during the time I was there, fired at us a great many times.  Some of the brethren died for the common necessaries of life, and perished from  starvation; and for once in my life, I had the pain of beholding some of my fellow  creatures fall victims to the Spirit of persecution, which did then, and has since prevailed  to such an extent in — men too, who were virtuous, and against whom,  no legal process, could for one moment, be sustained; but who, in consequence of  their love to God— attachment to his cause— and their determination to keep the  faith, were thus brought to an untimely grave— In the mean time and  , who had been the sole cause of the Settlement being made, solicited the  Saints to leave the place. Thomas said he had assurances from the Mob that if  they would leave the place they would not be hurt; and that they would be paid for all  losses which they had sustained, and that they had come as mediators to accomplish  this object; and that persons should be appointed to set value on the property which  they had to leave, and that they should be paid for it. They finally, through necessity,  had to comply and leave the place. Accordingly the committee was appointed— Judge  Erickson was one of the Committee, and Major Flory, of Rutsville another— the names of  <x> the others not recollected. They appraised the Real Estate, that was all. When the  people came to start, their horses, oxen and cows were gone, many of them, and could  not be found— it was known at the time, and the Mob boasted of it, that they had  killed the oxen and lived on them. A great number of Cows Oxen and Horses  have never been seen since, which doubtless the mob took and kept— and that was  all the brethren ever received of the promised pay for all their losses at  Many houses belonging to my brethren were burned, their cattle driven away, and a [p. 835]
October 10th. but instead of receiving any aid or even sympathy, from his Excellency, we were told that “the quarrel was between the Mormons and the Mob,” and that “we might fight it out” About this time a mob commanded by Hiram Standly took ’s goods out of his house, Mob at and said Standly set fire to ’s house and burned it before his eyes. and ordered him to leave the place forthwith, which he did by fleeing from to . The mob had sent to and got a cannon, powder and balls, and bodies of armed men had gathered in to aid them from , Saline, Howard, , Clinton, , Platt and other parts of the State, and a man by the name of Jackson from Howard County was appointed their leader— The Saints were forbid to go out of the Town under pain of death, and were shot at when they attempted to go out to get food of— which they were destitute. As fast as their Cattle, horses or other property got where the Mob could get hold of it, it was taken as spoil. By these outrages the brethren were obliged, most of them to live in waggons or tents, application had been made to the judge of the circuit court for protection, who ordered out two companies of Militia one commanded by , a Methodist priest and Mobocrat of the deepest die, the whole under the command of , another Mobber, if his letters speak his feelings. and his actions did not belie him, for he never made the first attempt to disperse the Mob, and when asked the reason of his conduct, he always replied that and his Company were mutinous and mobocratic, that he dare not attempt a dispersion of the Mob. Two other principal men of the mob were Major Ashby Member of the Legislature and a Presbyterian Clergyman. informed us that a greater part of his men under had mutinied, and that he should be obliged to draw them off from the place, for fear they would join the Mob: consequently he could offer us no assistance. We had now no hopes whatever, of successfully resisting the Mob, who kept constantly increasing: our provisions were entirely exhausted and we being wearied out, by continually standing on guard, and watching the movements of our enemies; who during the time I was there, fired at us a great many times. Some of the brethren died for the common necessaries of life, and perished from starvation; and for once in my life, I had the pain of beholding some of my fellow creatures fall victims to the Spirit of persecution, which did then, and has since prevailed to such an extent in — men too, who were virtuous, and against whom, no legal process, could for one moment, be sustained; but who, in consequence of their love to God— attachment to his cause— and their determination to keep the faith, were thus brought to an untimely grave— In the mean time and , who had been the sole cause of the Settlement being made, solicited the Saints to leave the place. Thomas said he had assurances from the Mob that if they would leave the place they would not be hurt; and that they would be paid for all losses which they had sustained, and that they had come as mediators to accomplish this object; and that persons should be appointed to set value on the property which they had to leave, and that they should be paid for it. They finally, through necessity, had to comply and leave the place. Accordingly the committee was appointed— Judge Erickson was one of the Committee, and Major Flory, of Rutsville another— the names of x the others not recollected. They appraised the Real Estate, that was all. When the people came to start, their horses, oxen and cows were gone, many of them, and could not be found— it was known at the time, and the Mob boasted of it, that they had killed the oxen and lived on them. A great number of Cows Oxen and Horses have never been seen since, which doubtless the mob took and kept— and that was all the brethren ever received of the promised pay for all their losses at — Many houses belonging to my brethren were burned, their cattle driven away, and a [p. 835]
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