History, 1838–1856, volume B-1 [1 September 1834–2 November 1838]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 614
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President said, that the wickedness of brother Green  <September 16.  Council.> in condemning President Smith is evident from the testimony,  and that brother Aldridge also did act foolishly, and by the  influence of a wrong spirit in questioning the integrity of the heads  of the church, in the purchase of the book, and that president  Smith was and is justifiable, in doing as he has done, in this  matter, and should not be censured, as he has been done, in  this matter by brother Green.
<’s observations.> Presedent then arose, and showed by a few plain  remarks, how Satan had sought from the beginning, to destroy  the Book of Mormon; and, in order to do this, had been actu ally leveling his shafts againts the Servants of God, who were  called to bring it forth, and bear testimony of it to the world;  and now hath sought occasion against the servants in tempt ing brethren to say they had equivocated in the price of the  record Book, which was presented last Sabbath: and that  brother Aldridge. and perhaps others fell under this evil  influence, and brother Green justifies them in this thing  and condemns President Smith; and is not and ought not  to be justified in so doing. went on to shew  that the book was purchased as cheap as it could be, and was  < inrrupted> actually worth what was given for it, (namely 12 dollars.) requested leave to interrupt a  moment, to inform the council that a moment before, bro  Green passed the house, and when the speaker told him the  councils was considering his case, and requested him to come  in; he said that he should go about his own business, so and  so went on his way regardless of the council. resumed shewing that the design of brother Aldridge  or at least of the spirit that was in him, was to destroy the  character of the heads of the Church, and shewed that we  intended to speculate out of the brethren, and extort from  them more than the cost of the book: and now instead of  regarding our feelings, he disregards us altogether, and  shows that he has no faith in the High council. Soon  <H. Green came in.> after brother Green came in, and said that he had been  detained longer than he intended; having been to  on business, and had to deliver the horse and harness to the  owner before he could attend <to> the council.
<  spoke. – Decision.> then arose and decided that brother Green  should not have been hindered from being here, by any other  business; and if so, he should have notified the council,  <.> and requested an adjournment. then  observed that he thought the case sufficiently brought before the  <,  Continued> council, and would say no more: and  proceeded to give his decision; That brother Green Should, (if he  were aggrieved with president Smith, have gone and told him  of his difficulty, and not have said any thing about it to his [p. 614]
President said, that the wickedness of brother Green September 16. Council. in condemning President Smith is evident from the testimony, and that brother Aldridge also did act foolishly, and by the influence of a wrong spirit in questioning the integrity of the heads of the church, in the purchase of the book, and that president Smith was and is justifiable, in doing as he has done, in this matter, and should not be censured, as he has been done, in this matter by brother Green.
’s observations. Presedent then arose, and showed by a few plain remarks, how Satan had sought from the beginning, to destroy the Book of Mormon; and, in order to do this, had been actually leveling his shafts againts the Servants of God, who were called to bring it forth, and bear testimony of it to the world; and now hath sought occasion against the servants in tempting brethren to say they had equivocated in the price of the record Book, which was presented last Sabbath: and that brother Aldridge. and perhaps others fell under this evil influence, and brother Green justifies them in this thing and condemns President Smith; and is not and ought not to be justified in so doing. went on to shew that the book was purchased as cheap as it could be, and was inrrupted actually worth what was given for it, (namely 12 dollars.) requested leave to interrupt a moment, to inform the council that a moment before, bro Green passed the house, and when the speaker told him the council was considering his case, and requested him to come in; he said that he should go about his own business, and so went on his way regardless of the council. resumed shewing that the design of brother Aldridge or at least of the spirit that was in him, was to destroy the character of the heads of the Church, and shewed that we intended to speculate out of the brethren, and extort from them more than the cost of the book: and now instead of regarding our feelings, he disregards us altogether, and shows that he has no faith in the High council. Soon H. Green came in. after brother Green came in, and said that he had been detained longer than he intended; having been to on business, and had to deliver the horse and harness to the owner before he could attend to the council.
spoke. – Decision. then arose and decided that brother Green should not have been hindered from being here, by any other business; and if so, he should have notified the council, . and requested an adjournment. then observed that he thought the case sufficiently brought before the , Continued council, and would say no more: and proceeded to give his decision; That brother Green Should, (if he were aggrieved with president Smith, have gone and told him of his difficulty, and not have said any thing about it to his [p. 614]
Page 614