Journal, December 1842–June 1844; Book 2, 10 March 1843–14 July 1843

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page [257]
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Editorial Note
, who was keeping JS’s journal at the time, did not accompany JS and his family to visit ’s sister in , Illinois. On 17 June, four days after JS left , governor of issued a writ for JS’s arrest on a requisition Ford had received from governor charging JS with treason against the state of Missouri. Hearing of the writ, and rode horseback almost 190 miles—by Clayton’s reckoning—in sixty-four hours to warn JS of possible arrest. Clayton and Markham met JS on 21 June and delivered the message.Two days later, in spite of the warning, JS was arrested by , deputy sheriff of , Illinois, and , sheriff of , Missouri. With the help of legal counsel, JS eventually managed to obtain a writ of habeas corpus “returnable before the nearest tribunal in the fifth judicial circuit authorised to hear, and determine, writs of habeas corpus.” Clayton, meanwhile, returned to Nauvoo for help. By 29 June, horsemen from Nauvoo intercepted JS and his arresters and JS convinced his lawyers that his writ of habeas corpus should be heard in the Nauvoo Municipal Court.
, in , recorded the little information he received about these proceedings in JS’s journal, along with his direct observations of other events that transpired in Nauvoo during JS’s absence. Richards resumed more detailed accounts of JS’s activities on 30 June 1843, when JS returned to Nauvoo.

14 June 1843 • Wednesday
Wednesday Jun[e] 14.— [16 lines blank] [p. [257]]

Editorial Note
, who was keeping JS’s journal at the time, did not accompany JS and his family to visit ’s sister in , Illinois. On 17 June, four days after JS left , governor of issued a writ for JS’s arrest on a requisition Ford had received from governor charging JS with treason against the state of Missouri. Hearing of the writ, and rode horseback almost 190 miles—by Clayton’s reckoning—in sixty-four hours to warn JS of possible arrest. Clayton and Markham met JS on 21 June and delivered the message.Two days later, in spite of the warning, JS was arrested by , deputy sheriff of , Illinois, and , sheriff of , Missouri. With the help of legal counsel, JS eventually managed to obtain a writ of habeas corpus “returnable before the nearest tribunal in the fifth judicial circuit authorised to hear, and determine, writs of habeas corpus.” Clayton, meanwhile, returned to Nauvoo for help. By 29 June, horsemen from Nauvoo intercepted JS and his arresters and JS convinced his lawyers that his writ of habeas corpus should be heard in the Nauvoo Municipal Court.
, in , recorded the little information he received about these proceedings in JS’s journal, along with his direct observations of other events that transpired in Nauvoo during JS’s absence. Richards resumed more detailed accounts of JS’s activities on 30 June 1843, when JS returned to Nauvoo.

14 June 1843 • Wednesday
Wednesday June 14.— [16 lines blank] [p. [257]]
Page [257]