History, 1838–1856, volume B-1 [1 September 1834–2 November 1838]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 682
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short time suffices to adopt their own babits [habits?] to the changes  <January 6  The Indians> which a change of the animals destined for their food, may  require. Ample arrangements have also been made for the  support of schools: in some instances council houses and  churches are to be erected, dwellings constructed for the chiefs,  and mills for cotton use. Funds have been set apart for  the maintainance of the poor; the most necessary mechan ical arts have been introduced, and blacksmiths, Gun smiths, wheelrights, millwrights, &c are supported among  them. Steel and iron, and sometimes salt. are purchased  for them; and ploughs, and other farming utensils, domestic  animals, looms, spinning wheels, cards &c. are presented  to them. And besides these beneficial arrangements, annuities  are, in all cases, paid, amounting, in some instances, to  more than thirty dollars, for each individual of the tribe, and  in all cases sufficiently great, if justly divided and  prudently expended, to enable them, in addition to their own  exertions, to live comfortably. And as a stimulous for exertion  it is now provided by law that “in all cases of the appointment  of interpreters, or other persons employed for the benefit of the  Indians, a preference shall be given to persons of Indian  descent, if such can be found, who are properly qualified  for the discharge of the duties.”
Such are the arrangements for the physical comfort, and  for the moral improvement of the Indians. The necessary  measures for their political advancement, and for their sep aration from our citizens, have not been neglected. The  pledge of the has been given by Congress, that  the country destined for the residence of this people, shall  be forever “secured and guaranteed to them.” A country  west of and Arkansas, has been assigned to  them, into which the white settlements are not to be  pushed. No political communities can be formed in  that extensive region, except those which are established  by the Indians themselves, or by the for them,  and with their concurrence. A barrier has thus been  raised, for their protection against the encroachments  of the citizens, and guarding the Indians as far as possi ble, from those evils which have brought them to their pres ent condition. Summary authority has been given, by  law, to destroy all ardent spirits found in their coun try, without waiting the doubtful result and slow process  of a legal seizure. I consider the absolute and uncondi tional interdiction of this article, among these people, as  the first and great step in their melioration. Half way  measures will answer no purpose. These cannot successfully  contend against the cupidity of the seller, and the over powering appetite of the buyer. And the destructive effects [p. 682]
short time suffices to adopt their own babits [habits] to the changes January 6 The Indians which a change of the animals destined for their food, may require. Ample arrangements have also been made for the support of schools: in some instances council houses and churches are to be erected, dwellings constructed for the chiefs, and mills for cotton use. Funds have been set apart for the maintainance of the poor; the most necessary mechanical arts have been introduced, and blacksmiths, Gunsmiths, wheelrights, millwrights, &c are supported among them. Steel and iron, and sometimes salt. are purchased for them; and ploughs, and other farming utensils, domestic animals, looms, spinning wheels, cards &c. are presented to them. And besides these beneficial arrangements, annuities are, in all cases, paid, amounting, in some instances, to more than thirty dollars, for each individual of the tribe, and in all cases sufficiently great, if justly divided and prudently expended, to enable them, in addition to their own exertions, to live comfortably. And as a stimulous for exertion it is now provided by law that “in all cases of the appointment of interpreters, or other persons employed for the benefit of the Indians, a preference shall be given to persons of Indian descent, if such can be found, who are properly qualified for the discharge of the duties.”
Such are the arrangements for the physical comfort, and for the moral improvement of the Indians. The necessary measures for their political advancement, and for their separation from our citizens, have not been neglected. The pledge of the has been given by Congress, that the country destined for the residence of this people, shall be forever “secured and guaranteed to them.” A country west of and Arkansas, has been assigned to them, into which the white settlements are not to be pushed. No political communities can be formed in that extensive region, except those which are established by the Indians themselves, or by the for them, and with their concurrence. A barrier has thus been raised, for their protection against the encroachments of the citizens, and guarding the Indians as far as possible, from those evils which have brought them to their present condition. Summary authority has been given, by law, to destroy all ardent spirits found in their country, without waiting the doubtful result and slow process of a legal seizure. I consider the absolute and unconditional interdiction of this article, among these people, as the first and great step in their melioration. Half way measures will answer no purpose. These cannot successfully contend against the cupidity of the seller, and the overpowering appetite of the buyer. And the destructive effects [p. 682]
Page 682