History, 1838–1856, volume B-1 [1 September 1834–2 November 1838]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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lands to be their own, how sweet it is to think, that they may one  <January 6.> day be gathered by the gospel. Our venerable President of these  , (Andrew Jackson,) speaks of the Indians as follows;
<The Indians,  President’s  observations.> “The plan of removing the Aboriginal People, who yet remain with in the settled portions of the , to the country west  of the , approaches its consummation. It was  adopted on the most mature consideration of the condition of  this race, and ought to be persisted in till the object is ac complished and prosecuted with as much rigor vigor as a just regard  to their circumstances will permit, and as fast as their con sent can be obtained. All preceeding experiments for the im provement of the Indians have failed. It seems now to be in an  established fact, that they cannot live in contact with a civil ized community and prosper. Ages of fruitless endeavors have,  at length, brought us to a knowledge of this principle of inter communication with them. The past we cannot recall, but  the future we can provide for. Independently of the treaty stip ulations into which we have entered with the various tribes,  for the usufructuary rights they have ceded to us, no one  can doubt the moral duty of the government of the to protect, and if possible, to preserve, and perpetuate,  the scattered remnants of this race, which are left within our  borders. In the discharge of this duty, an extensive region  in the West has been assigned for their permanent residence  It has been divided into districts, and allotted among  them. Many have already removed, and others are pre paring to go; and with the exceptions of two small bands  living in and Indiana, not exceeding fifteen hun dred persons, and of the Cherokees, all the tribes on the  east side of the , and extending from Lake  Michigan to Florida, have entered into engagements  which will lead to their transplantation.
The plan for their removal and re-establishment is founded  upon the knowledge we have gained of their character and habits  and has been dictated by a spirit of enlarged liberality. A  territory exceeding in extent that relinquished, has been gran ted to each tribe. Of its climate, fertility, and capacity to sup port an Indian population, the representations are highly  favorable. To these districts the Indians are removed, at  the expence of the ; and, with certain supplies  of clothing, arms, ammunition, and other indispensable  articles; they are also furnished gratuitously with provision  for the period of a year after their arrival at their new homes  In that time, from the nature of the country, and of the  products raised by them, they can subsist themselves by  agr[i]cultural labor, if they choose to resort to that mode  of life; If they do not they are on the skirts of the great  prairies, where countless herds of Buffalo roam, and a [p. 681]
lands to be their own, how sweet it is to think, that they may one January 6. day be gathered by the gospel. Our venerable President of these , (Andrew Jackson,) speaks of the Indians as follows;
The Indians, President’s observations. “The plan of removing the Aboriginal People, who yet remain within the settled portions of the , to the country west of the , approaches its consummation. It was adopted on the most mature consideration of the condition of this race, and ought to be persisted in till the object is accomplished and prosecuted with as much vigor as a just regard to their circumstances will permit, and as fast as their consent can be obtained. All preceeding experiments for the improvement of the Indians have failed. It seems now to be an established fact, that they cannot live in contact with a civilized community and prosper. Ages of fruitless endeavors have, at length, brought us to a knowledge of this principle of intercommunication with them. The past we cannot recall, but the future we can provide for. Independently of the treaty stipulations into which we have entered with the various tribes, for the usufructuary rights they have ceded to us, no one can doubt the moral duty of the government of the to protect, and if possible, to preserve, and perpetuate, the scattered remnants of this race, which are left within our borders. In the discharge of this duty, an extensive region in the West has been assigned for their permanent residence It has been divided into districts, and allotted among them. Many have already removed, and others are preparing to go; and with the exceptions of two small bands living in and Indiana, not exceeding fifteen hundred persons, and of the Cherokees, all the tribes on the east side of the , and extending from Lake Michigan to Florida, have entered into engagements which will lead to their transplantation.
The plan for their removal and re-establishment is founded upon the knowledge we have gained of their character and habits and has been dictated by a spirit of enlarged liberality. A territory exceeding in extent that relinquished, has been granted to each tribe. Of its climate, fertility, and capacity to support an Indian population, the representations are highly favorable. To these districts the Indians are removed, at the expence of the ; and, with certain supplies of clothing, arms, ammunition, and other indispensable articles; they are also furnished gratuitously with provision for the period of a year after their arrival at their new homes In that time, from the nature of the country, and of the products raised by them, they can subsist themselves by agricultural labor, if they choose to resort to that mode of life; If they do not they are on the skirts of the great prairies, where countless herds of Buffalo roam, and a [p. 681]
Page 681