Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 145
Chapter 29
Chap. 29.
 
prosecutes Joseph <​by an ex parte proceeding.​>
 
About the first of Aug. returned home, bringing us news of Joseph’s success. This intelligence produced in a great desire to go down to to see how they were prospering; being made known to his , she resolved to prevent him from going; also, to bring Joseph into difficulty which would be likely to hinder him from ever accomplishing the work, in which he was engaged. To this end she undertook to prove, that Joseph never had the Record which he professed to have; and, that he pretended to have in his possession certain gold plates, which was for the express purpose of obtaining money. So she mounted her horse, flew <​rode​> from house to house through the neighborhood, like a dark spirit, making diligent inquiry wherever she had the least hope of gleaning anything; and stirred up every malicious feeling which would tend to subserve her wicked purpose. Having ascertained the number and strength of her adherents, she entered a complaint against Joseph before a certain Magistrate of Lyons; she then sent word to Lyman Cowdery, requesting him to come to the above place prepared to go post haste to , provided the decision should be given against Joseph, to assist the officers in securing and confining him in prison. [p. 145]
Chapter 29
Chap. 29.
 
prosecutes Joseph by an ex parte proceeding.
 
About the first of Aug. returned home, bringing us news of Joseph’s success. This intelligence produced in a great desire to go down to to see how they were prospering; being made known to his , she resolved to prevent him from going; also, to bring Joseph into difficulty which would be likely to hinder him from ever accomplishing the work, in which he was engaged. To this end she undertook to prove, that Joseph never had the Record which he professed to have; and, that he pretended to have in his possession certain gold plates, which was for the express purpose of obtaining money. So she mounted her horse, rode from house to house through the neighborhood, like a dark spirit, making diligent inquiry wherever she had the least hope of gleaning anything; and stirred up every malicious feeling which would tend to subserve her wicked purpose. Having ascertained the number and strength of her adherents, she entered a complaint against Joseph before a certain Magistrate of Lyons; she then sent word to Lyman Cowdery, requesting him to come to the above place prepared to go post haste to , provided the decision should be given against Joseph, to assist the officers in securing and confining him in prison. [p. 145]
Page 145