Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 38
image
Chapter 10
Chap. 10.
 
A present of one thousand dollars from <John> Mudget and Stephen Mack
 
Soon after I was married, we, (my and ,) went to see my parents; and, as we were about setting out on this visit, my brother Stephen, and and his partner in business, (John Mudget) were conve[r]sing upon the subject of my leaving them, when the conversation turned upon making me a marriage present:
“Well,’ said Mr. Mudget, “ ought to have something worth naming, and I will give her just as much as you will”
“Done’ said my brother, ‘I will give her 500 dollars in cash”
‘Good’ said the other, ‘and I will give her 500 dollars more.” And they, accordingly, wrote a check on their banker for 1000 dollars, and presented me with the same. This check I laid aside, having other means by me, sufficient to purchase my house-keeping furniture.
Having visited my and mother, we returned again to Tunbridge, where my owned a handsome farm; which upon <which we> settled ourselves, upon it and began to cultivate the soil. We lived on this place about six years, tilling the earth for livlihood.
In 1802, we rented our farm in Tunbidge and moved to the Town of Randolph, where we opened a merchantile establishment. We had two children, and when we moved to this place [p. 38]
Chapter 10
Chap. 10.
 
A present of one thousand dollars from John Mudget and Stephen Mack
 
Soon after I was married, we, (my and ,) went to see my parents; and, as we were about setting out on this visit, my brother Stephen, and and his partner in business, (John Mudget) were conversing upon the subject of my leaving them, when the conversation turned upon making me a marriage present:
“Well,’ said Mr. Mudget, “ ought to have something worth naming, and I will give her just as much as you will”
“Done’ said my brother, ‘I will give her 500 dollars in cash”
‘Good’ said the other, ‘and I will give her 500 dollars more.” And they, accordingly, wrote a check on their banker for 1000 dollars, and presented me with the same. This check I laid aside, having other means by me, sufficient to purchase my house-keeping furniture.
Having visited my and mother, we returned again to Tunbridge, where my owned a handsome farm; upon which we settled ourselves, and began to cultivate the soil. We lived on this place about six years, tilling the earth for livlihood.
In 1802, we rented our farm in Tunbidge and moved to the Town of Randolph, where we opened a merchantile establishment. We had two children, and when we moved to this place [p. 38]
Page 38