Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 58
image
feelings.
From this time forward she continued mending until she entirely recovered.
 
Chapter 16
Chap. 16.
 
Extraction of a large The sufferings of Joseph Smith Jr. with a fever soreextraction of large fractures <fragments> of bone from one of his legs.
 
Joseph, our third son, after something like two weeks sickness, having and having about recovered from the typhus fever, screamed out, while sitting in a chair with a severe pain in his shoulder; and in a very short time appeared to be in such agony, that we apprehended <feared> the consequence would be something serious. We immediately sent for a doctor; who, after his arrival, examined the patient and said, that his opinion was, that the pain was was occasioned by a sprain. But the child declared, this could not be the case; as he had received no injury whatever; but, that a severe pain had seized him all at once; and of the cause of which he was entirely ignorant. of However, the physician still insisted that it must be a sprain, and therefore anointed his shoulder with some bone linament; but this was of no advantage to him: the pain continued the same as before.
Two weeks of extreme suffering having elapsed, the attendant physician concluded to make closer examinination; and he found that a large fever sore had gathered [p. 58]
feelings.
From this time forward she continued mending until she entirely recovered.
 
Chapter 16
Chap. 16.
 
The sufferings of Joseph Smith Jr. with a fever soreextraction of large fragments of bone from one of his legs.
 
Joseph, our third son, after something like two weeks sickness, and having about recovered from the typhus fever, screamed out, while sitting in a chair with a severe pain in his shoulder; and in a very short time appeared to be in such agony, that we feared the consequence would be something serious. We immediately sent for a doctor; who, after his arrival, examined the patient and said, that his opinion was, that the pain was occasioned by a sprain. But the child declared, this could not be the case; as he had received no injury whatever; but, that a severe pain had seized him all at once; and of the cause he was entirely ignorant. However, the physician still insisted that it must be a sprain, and therefore anointed his shoulder with some bone linament; but this was of no advantage to him: the pain continued the same as before.
Two weeks of extreme suffering having elapsed, the attendant physician concluded to make closer examinination; and he found that a large fever sore had gathered [p. 58]
Page 58