Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 186
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obtained permission of the jailor, he immediately went out  and brought his some comfortable food. After  which he remained with him untill the next day, when  the business was attended to; and went  out into the jail yard to a cooper shop, where he obta ined employment at coopering and followed the same un till he was released which was 30 days. He purchased, <preached>,  during his confinement here, every sunday; and when  he was released, he baptized two persons, whom he  had thus converted.
 
Chapter 37
Chap. 37.
 
The family of remove to
Waterloo
 
returned from , the same day  that my was liberated from the cell. And aft er relating to us the success, with which he had met at  , he gave us an account of his third mission to  .—
When I arrived at ’s said he, Mrs. Green [Rhoda Young Greene]  informed me that her was absent from home; th at there was no prospect of selling my books; and even the  one which I had left with them, she expected I would  have to take away; as had no disposition to  purchase it. I then talked with her a short time; and  binding my knapsack upon my shoulders, arose to  depart; but, as I bade her farewell, it was impressed [p. 186]
obtained permission of the jailor, he immediately went out and brought his some comfortable food. After which he remained with him untill the next day, when the business was attended to; and went out into the jail yard to a cooper shop, where he obtained employment at coopering and followed the same untill he was released which was 30 days. He preached, during his confinement here, every sunday; and when he was released, he baptized two persons, whom he had thus converted.
 
Chapter 37
Chap. 37.
 
The family of remove to
Waterloo
 
returned from , the same day that my was liberated from the cell. And after relating to us the success, with which he had met at , he gave us an account of his third mission to .—
When I arrived at ’s said he, Mrs. Green Rhoda Young Greene informed me that her was absent from home; that there was no prospect of selling my books; and even the one which I had left with them, she expected I would have to take away; as had no disposition to purchase it. I then talked with her a short time; and binding my knapsack upon my shoulders, arose to depart; but, as I bade her farewell, it was impressed [p. 186]
Page 186