Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 150
image
This suggestion pleased ; and he asked the Lord for a testimony concerning his going for Joseph, and was told by the voice of the spirit to go as soon as his wheat was harrowed in. The next morning went to the field, and found that he had two heavy days work before him. He then said to himself, that, if he should be enabled, by any means whatever to do this work sooner than the same had ever been done on the farm before, he would receive it as an evidence that it was the will of God that he should do all in his power to assist Joseph Smith in the work in which he was engaged. He then fastened his horses to the harrow; and, instead of dividing the field into what is usually termed lands by farmers, he drove round the whole of it: and continued harrowing in this way till noon; when, stopping for dinner, he looked around, and discovered to his surprise, that he had harrowed in full half the wheat. After dinner he went on as before; and by evening, he finished the whole two days work.
His , going into the field the same evening saw what had been done, and exclaimed: “there must be an overruling hand in this; and I think you had better go down to as soon as your plaster-paris is sown.
The next morning took a wooden measure under his arm, and went out to sow <the> plaster; which he had left two days previous in heaps, near <one of> his sister’s dwelling; but on approaching the place, where he had left it he discovered that it was gone. He then ran to his sister and inquired of her, if she knew what had become of it. She said with some surprise: “why do you ask me? was it not all sown yesterday? [p. 150]
This suggestion pleased ; and he asked the Lord for a testimony concerning his going for Joseph, and was told by the voice of the spirit to go as soon as his wheat was harrowed in. The next morning went to the field, and found that he had two heavy days work before him. He then said to himself, that, if he should be enabled, by any means whatever to do this work sooner than the same had ever been done on the farm before, he would receive it as an evidence that it was the will of God that he should do all in his power to assist Joseph Smith in the work in which he was engaged. He then fastened his horses to the harrow; and, instead of dividing the field into what is usually termed lands by farmers, he drove round the whole of it: and continued harrowing in this way till noon; when, stopping for dinner, he looked around, and discovered to his surprise, that he had harrowed in full half the wheat. After dinner he went on as before; and by evening, he finished the whole two days work.
His , going into the field the same evening saw what had been done, and exclaimed: “there must be an overruling hand in this; and I think you had better go down to as soon as your plaster-paris is sown.
The next morning took a wooden measure under his arm, and went out to sow the plaster; which he had left two days previous in heaps, near one of his sister’s dwelling; but on approaching the place, where he had left it he discovered that it was gone. He then ran to his sister and inquired of her, if she knew what had become of it. She said with some surprise: “why do you ask me? was it not all sown yesterday? [p. 150]
Page 150