Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 198
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neither mention a word about your religion; for, if you do, you  will never be able to get a house or a boat either.”
I told them, I should tell the people precisely who I was;  “And, continued I, “if you are ashamed of Christ you must not  expect to be prospered; and I shall wonder if we do not get  to before you”
While we were talking with the brethren, an other boat landed having on board about 30 brethren, among  whom , who immediately joined us, and  like the brethren, he was decidedly opposed to  our attending to prayers, or making known that we were  professors of religion. He said, that, if our company persisted  in singing and praying, as we had hitherto done, we would  be mobbed before the next morning. “Mob it is then;  said I; we shall attend to prayers before sunset, mob or  no mob.”
, at this, left considerably irritated. I  then requested brothers and , to go around a mong the boatmen, and enquire for one Capt. Blake  this man was formerly captain of a boat belonging to my  brother Gen [Stephen] Mack; and upon my brothers decease Blake  purchased the boat and still commanded the same.  They went in search of, and soon found the man; and fr om him they learned, that his boat was already laden with  the usual amount of freight passengers and freight. He said how ever, that he thought he could make room for us, if we wo uld take a deck passage. As this was our only opport unity, we moved our goods on board the next day; and  by the time that we had fairly settled ourselves, it began  to rain. This rendered our situation very uncomfortable;  and some of the sisters complained bitterly, because we had  not hired a house, till the boat was ready to start. In fact  their case was rather a trying one; for some of them had sick [p. 198]
neither mention a word about your religion; for, if you do, you will never be able to get a house or a boat either.”
I told them, I should tell the people precisely who I was; “And, continued I, “if you are ashamed of Christ you must not expect to be prospered; and I shall wonder if we do not get to before you”
While we were talking with the brethren, another boat landed having on board about 30 brethren, among whom , who immediately joined us, and like the brethren, he was decidedly opposed to our attending to prayers, or making known that we were professors of religion. He said, that, if our company persisted in singing and praying, as we had hitherto done, we would be mobbed before the next morning. “Mob it is then; said I; we shall attend to prayers before sunset, mob or no mob.”
, at this, left considerably irritated. I then requested brothers and , to go around among the boatmen, and enquire for one Capt. Blake this man was formerly captain of a boat belonging to my brother Gen Stephen Mack; and upon my brothers decease Blake purchased the boat and still commanded the same. They went in search of, and soon found the man; and from him they learned, that his boat was already laden with the usual amount of passengers and freight. He said however, that he thought he could make room for us, if we would take a deck passage. As this was our only opportunity, we moved our goods on board the next day; and by the time that we had fairly settled ourselves, it began to rain. This rendered our situation very uncomfortable; and some of the sisters complained bitterly, because we had not hired a house, till the boat was ready to start. In fact their case was rather a trying one; for some of them had sick [p. 198]
Page 198