Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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enced building a house, which was designed for both a meeting and  school house. This was left in the hands of brother for completion; and was to be in readiness for use by the  commencement of the ensuing winter. It is true we held m eetings in it during the summer, but then it only served as  a shelter from the sun. We were now unusually anxious to meet  together as often as possible, in order to unite our faith and prayers in  behalf of our brethren; but for a length of time after they left,  almost every meeting was broken up by a storm. In consequence  of this, together with the near approach of winter, we began to  urge upon the necessity of hurrying the building;  but he said that he could do nothing about the matter as he had  neither time or means. This made me very sorrowful: I studied  upon it a long time; finally I told my , I believe that  I could raise the means myself to finish the building; and, if he wou ld consent give his consent, I would try and see what I could do.
He said he would be glad if I could do anything towards for warding the work; and, that I migh[t] take any course I saw fit  in order to accomplish it. I then wrote a subscription paper, in  which I agreed to refund all the money, that I should receive in  case it could not be appropriated to the purpose, for which it  should be given subscribed. This article I first took each member of  my family who were at home, as also my boarders; then I proceed ed with it to father Bosly’s. Here I received a considerable assis ance; and, as I was leaving the house, I met ,  and informed him of what I was doing. He seemed pleased, and  told me to go on and prosper. And it was even so, I did prosper;  So that in two weeks I had every thing in fine order for co mmencing the work. I employed a man by the name of Bar,  to make [4 words illegible] and ease the doors, and also to ease the windows and  make the sash; all this was to be done at a very reduced price.  Mr Bar went immediately to the house, and began to take the measu rement of the windows; but, in consequence of some misunderstanding, broth [p. 222]
enced building a house, which was designed for both a meeting and school house. This was left in the hands of brother for completion; and was to be in readiness for use by the commencement of the ensuing winter. It is true we held meetings in it during the summer, but then it only served as a shelter from the sun. We were now unusually anxious to meet together as often as possible, in order to unite our faith and prayers in behalf of our brethren; but for a length of time after they left, almost every meeting was broken up by a storm. In consequence of this, together with the near approach of winter, we began to urge upon the necessity of hurrying the building; but he said that he could do nothing about the matter as he had neither time or means. This made me very sorrowful: I studied upon it a long time; finally I told my , I believe that I could raise the means myself to finish the building; and, if he would give his consent, I would try and see what I could do.
He said he would be glad if I could do anything towards forwarding the work; and, that I might take any course I saw fit in order to accomplish it. I then wrote a subscription paper, in which I agreed to refund all the money, that I should receive in case it could not be appropriated to the purpose, for which it should be subscribed. This article I first took each member of my family who were at home, as also my boarders; then I proceeded with it to father Bosly’s. Here I received a considerable assisance; and, as I was leaving the house, I met , and informed him of what I was doing. He seemed pleased, and told me to go on and prosper. And it was even so, I did prosper; So that in two weeks I had every thing in fine order for commencing the work. I employed a man by the name of Bar, to make and ease the doors, and also to ease the windows and make the sash; all this was to be done at a very reduced price. Mr Bar went immediately to the house, and began to take the measurement of the windows; but, in consequence of some misunderstanding, broth [p. 222]
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