Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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into the . It was with much difficulty we could get this per mission to go and see our families and get some clothing; but af ter a considerable consultation, we were permitted to go under  a strong guard of five or six men to each of us, and were not  permitted to speak to any one of our families under the pain of  death. The guard that went with me ordered my wife to get me  some clothes immediately— within two minutes; and if she did not  do it I should go off without them. I was obliged to submit to  their tyranical orders, however painful it was, to with my wife  and children clinging to my arms and to the skirts of my garme nts, and was not permitted to utter to them one word of consolation,  and in a moment was hurried away from them at the point of  the bayonet. We were hurried back to the wagons and ordered  into them, all in about the same space of time. In the mean  while, our and , and sisters, had forced their way to  the wagons to get permission to see us; but were forbidden to speak  to us; and they immediately drove off for . We tra velled trave about 12 miles that evening, and encamped for the ni ght. The same strong guard was kept around us, and were relieved  every two hours, and we were permitted to sleep on the ground, the nig hts were cold with considerable snow on the ground; and for the want  of covering and clothing, we suffered extremely with the cold. That  night was a commencement of a fit of sickness from which I have  not wholy recovered unto this day, in consequence of my exposure to the  inclemency of the weather. Our provision was fresh beef roasted in  the fire on a stick; the army having no bread in consequence of  mills to grind grain. In the morning at the dawn of day, we were  forced on our journey, and were exhibited to the inhabitants along  the road, the same as they exhibit a caravan of Elephants or  camels. We were examined from head to foot by men, women, and  children, only I believe they did not make us open our mouths  to look at our teeth. This treatment was continued incessantly,  until we arrived at , <in> Jackson County. After our arri [p. 267]
into the . It was with much difficulty we could get this permission to go and see our families and get some clothing; but after a considerable consultation, we were permitted to go under a strong guard of five or six men to each of us, and were not permitted to speak to any one of our families under the pain of death. The guard that went with me ordered my wife to get me some clothes immediately— within two minutes; and if she did not do it I should go off without them. I was obliged to submit to their tyranical orders, however painful it was, with my wife and children clinging to my arms and to the skirts of my garments, and was not permitted to utter to them one word of consolation, and in a moment was hurried away from them at the point of the bayonet. We were hurried back to the wagons and ordered into them, all in about the same space of time. In the mean while, our and , and sisters, had forced their way to the wagons to get permission to see us; but were forbidden to speak to us; and they immediately drove off for . We travelled about 12 miles that evening, and encamped for the night. The same strong guard was kept around us, and were relieved every two hours, and we were permitted to sleep on the ground, the nights were cold with considerable snow on the ground; and for the want of covering and clothing, we suffered extremely with the cold. That night was a commencement of a fit of sickness from which I have not wholy recovered unto this day, in consequence of my exposure to the inclemency of the weather. Our provision was fresh beef roasted in the fire on a stick; the army having no bread in consequence of mills to grind grain. In the morning at the dawn of day, we were forced on our journey, and were exhibited to the inhabitants along the road, the same as they exhibit a caravan of Elephants or camels. We were examined from head to foot by men, women, and children, only I believe they did not make us open our mouths to look at our teeth. This treatment was continued incessantly, until we arrived at , in Jackson County. After our arri [p. 267]
Page 267