Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 293
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’s continued to sink, his health constantly fail ing, until we found that medicine was of no benefit to him
As the season advanced the brethren began to feel the  effects of the hardships which they had endured, as also the  unhealthiness of the climate, in which we were then situated.  They came down with agues and <Bilious> fevers to such an extent, that  there were whole families, in which not one was able to help  another himself to a drink of cold water. Among the sick were and his family, also my daughter . Joseph. ,  seeing the distress, commenced taking the sick into their  own house, with the view of taking care of them, and mak ing them more comfortable, this they continued to do until  their house became so crowded they were compelled to spread  a tent for that part of the family, who were still on their  feet, in order to make room in the house for the sick.  During this time of distress, , my ’s brot her, came up from Pike County, Illinois to consult with   in relation to some church buisness, and retur ned with the intentention of bringing his family hither; but  was taken sick and died before he could accomplish it, and  we never saw him again. also came from , about this time and informed us that he had sent to  , for our provisions and furniture; and that all had  been destroyed by the mob: when he returned home he  took Lovina [Smith], s <oldest> daughter with him, hoping as  she was sick, that the ride would be <a> benefit to her. In  this he was disappointed, for she grew worse instead of better,  so that in a short time, he considered it necessary to send  for her , as she was not expected to live. As her   was not able to set up when the messenger arrived,   and went in his stead. On our arrival at  , we found Lovina better; and she continued  to mend until she regained her health, But the ague [p. 293]
continued to sink, his health constantly failing, until we found that medicine was of no benefit to him
As the season advanced the brethren began to feel the effects of the hardships which they had endured, as also the unhealthiness of the climate, in which we were then situated. They came down with agues and Bilious fevers to such an extent, that there were whole families, in which not one was able to help himself to a drink of cold water. Among the sick were and his family, also my daughter . Joseph. , seeing the distress, commenced taking the sick into their own house, with the view of taking care of them, and making them more comfortable, this they continued to do until their house became so crowded they were compelled to spread a tent for that part of the family, who were still on their feet, in order to make room in the house for the sick. During this time of distress, , my ’s brother, came up from Pike County, Illinois to consult with in relation to some church buisness, and returned with the intentention of bringing his family hither; but was taken sick and died before he could accomplish it, and we never saw him again. also came from , about this time and that all had been destroyed by the mob: when he returned home he took Lovina [Smith], s oldest daughter with him, hoping as she was sick, that the ride would be a benefit to her. In this he was disappointed, for she grew worse instead of better, so that in a short time, he considered it necessary to send for her , as she was not expected to live. As her was not able to set up when the messenger arrived, and went in his stead. On our arrival at , we found Lovina better; and she continued to mend until she regained her health, But the ague [p. 293]
Page 293