Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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weak, and coughed dreadfully; So that some nights, I had to  lift him out of bed. On one occasion of this kind he expressed  a fear that he should die with me alone. I told him that  this would not be the case, for it was impressed upon my  mind, that, when he died, he would have his children arou nd him. This comforted him much; for he was very anx ious to live until Joseph should return, that he might bless  him again before he should die.
This was in the winter of 1840. Before spring he got some  better: so that he was able to walk around a little, and attend  a few blessing meetings, in one of which he blessed Mrs Mary  Page the wife of one of twelve, and a young woman whom had baptized and confirmed on Bear Creek, but a few  days previous. In blessing the latter, repeated  a prophecy which had been pronounced upon her head, in her  confirmation as precisely as thoug he had been present when it was  uttered; stating that the spirit testified, that these things had  been predicted upon her head at her confirmation; which very  much surprized her as she knew that he had not received any  intimation of the same, except by the spirit of God.
In March. 1840, Joseph returned from the city of . At this time had taken a relapse, and was  confined to his bed. On Joseph’s arrival he administered to him,  and, for a short time my was better. In the ensuei ng April a conference was held in (formerly )  during which the result of Joseph’s mission to , was  made known to the brethren; who, after hearing that their petit ion was rejected, concluded, as they had done now tried every court , which was ascessible to them on Earth, to lay their case before the  court of heaven, and leave it in the hands of the great God.
Joseph, soon after his arrival, had a house built for us, near his  own; and one that was more commodius, than that which we had  previously occupied. When the heat of the ensueing summer [p. 295]
weak, and coughed dreadfully; So that some nights, I had to lift him out of bed. On one occasion of this kind he expressed a fear that he should die with me alone. I told him that this would not be the case, for it was impressed upon my mind, that, when he died, he would have his children around him. This comforted him much; for he was very anxious to live until Joseph should return, that he might bless him again before he should die.
This was in the winter of 1840. Before spring he got some better: so that he was able to walk around a little, and attend a few blessing meetings, in one of which he blessed Mrs Mary Page the wife of one of twelve, and a young woman whom had baptized and confirmed on Bear Creek, but a few days previous. In blessing the latter, repeated a prophecy which had been pronounced upon her head, in her confirmation as precisely as thoug he had been present when it was uttered; stating that the spirit testified, that these things had been predicted upon her head at her confirmation; which very much surprized her as she knew that he had not received any intimation of the same, except by the spirit of God.
In March. 1840, Joseph returned from the city of . At this time had taken a relapse, and was confined to his bed. On Joseph’s arrival he administered to him, and, for a short time my was better. In the ensueing April a conference was held in (formerly ) during which the result of Joseph’s mission to , was made known to the brethren; who, after hearing that their petition was rejected, concluded, as they had now tried every court, which was ascessible to them on Earth, to lay their case before the court of heaven, and leave it in the hands of the great God.
Joseph, soon after his arrival, had a house built for us, near his own; and one that was more commodius, than that which we had previously occupied. When the heat of the ensueing summer [p. 295]
Page 295