History, 1838–1856, volume B-1 [1 September 1834–2 November 1838]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 603
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and if there be no legal objections, he shall say, calling each by their <​August 17. General Assembly​> names, “you both mutually agree to be each others companion, husband and wife, observing the legal rights belonging to this condition; that is, keeping yourselves wholly for each other, and from all others, during your lives.” And when they have answered. “Yes,” he shall pronounce them “husband and wife,” in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ, and by virtue of the laws of the country vested in him; “may God add his blessings and keep you to fulfil your covenants from henceforth and forever, Amen.
<​Marriages recorded​> The clerk of every church should keep a record of all marriages, solemnized in his branch. All legal contracts of marriage made <​All legal contracts of marriage to be held Sacred.​> before a person is baptized into this church, should be held sacred and fulfilled. Inasmuch as this church of Christ has been reproached with the crime of fornication, and polygamy; we declare that we beleive, that one man should have one wife, and one woman but one husband, except in case of death, when either is at liberty to marry again. It is not right to persuade a woman to be baptized contrary to the will of her husband, neither is it lawful to influence her to leave her husband. All children are bound by law to obey their parents; and to influence them to embrace any religious faith, or be baptized, or leave their parents without their consent, is unlawful and unjust. We beleive that husbands, parents, and masters, who exercise control over their wives, childen, and servants, and prevent them from embracing the truth, will have to answer for that Sin.
President then read the following article on <​On Governments and laws in general​> “Governments and Laws in general,” which was accepted and adopted, and ordered to be printed in said book, by a unanimous vote.
“That our belief with regard to earthly governments, and laws in general, may not be misinterpreted nor misunderstood, we have thought proper to present, at the close of this volume, our opinion concerning the same.
We beleive that governments were instituted of God for the benefit of man, and that he holds men accountable for their acts in relation to [HC 2:247] them, either in making laws or administering them, for the good and safety of society.
We believe that no government can exist, in peace, except such laws are framed and held inviolate, as will secure to each individual the free exercise of conscience, and the right and control of property, and the protection of life.
We beleive that all governments necessarily require civil officers and magistrates to enforce the same, and that such as will administer the law in equity and justice should be sought for and upheld by the voice of the people, (if a Republic) or the will of the Sovreign.
We beleive that religion is instituted of God, and that men are amenable to him and him only for the exercise [p. 603]
and if there be no legal objections, he shall say, calling each by their August 17. General Assembly names, “you both mutually agree to be each others companion, husband and wife, observing the legal rights belonging to this condition; that is, keeping yourselves wholly for each other, and from all others, during your lives.” And when they have answered. “Yes,” he shall pronounce them “husband and wife,” in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ, and by virtue of the laws of the country vested in him; “may God add his blessings and keep you to fulfil your covenants from henceforth and forever, Amen.
Marriages recorded The clerk of every church should keep a record of all marriages, solemnized in his branch. All legal contracts of marriage made All legal contracts of marriage to be held Sacred. before a person is baptized into this church, should be held sacred and fulfilled. Inasmuch as this church of Christ has been reproached with the crime of fornication, and polygamy; we declare that we beleive, that one man should have one wife, and one woman but one husband, except in case of death, when either is at liberty to marry again. It is not right to persuade a woman to be baptized contrary to the will of her husband, neither is it lawful to influence her to leave her husband. All children are bound by law to obey their parents; and to influence them to embrace any religious faith, or be baptized, or leave their parents without their consent, is unlawful and unjust. We beleive that husbands, parents, and masters, who exercise control over their wives, childen, and servants, and prevent them from embracing the truth, will have to answer for that Sin.
President then read the following article on On Governments and laws in general “Governments and Laws in general,” which was accepted and adopted, and ordered to be printed in said book, by a unanimous vote.
“That our belief with regard to earthly governments, and laws in general, may not be misinterpreted nor misunderstood, we have thought proper to present, at the close of this volume, our opinion concerning the same.
We beleive that governments were instituted of God for the benefit of man, and that he holds men accountable for their acts in relation to [HC 2:247] them, either in making laws or administering them, for the good and safety of society.
We believe that no government can exist, in peace, except such laws are framed and held inviolate, as will secure to each individual the free exercise of conscience, and the right and control of property, and the protection of life.
We beleive that all governments necessarily require civil officers and magistrates to enforce the same, and that such as will administer the law in equity and justice should be sought for and upheld by the voice of the people, (if a Republic) or the will of the Sovreign.
We beleive that religion is instituted of God, and that men are amenable to him and him only for the exercise [p. 603]
Page 603