History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 Addenda

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<​1841 Augt. 7​> in ;—— we preached in a small branch of the Church <​in Calloway Co.​> and staid at the house of Sister Seeley Griffon <​Selah Parker,​> which was surrounded in the night by about twenty armed men, led by <​John Mc.Cartney​> a Campbellite Priest, who had sworn to kill the first Mormon Elder who should dare to preach in that place. The family were very much terrified. After trying the doors, the mobbers finally went away. We visited a number of small branches <​in Tennessee​>; the brethren generally arranged to be on hand with their money, or lands for exchange in the spring. Bror. Samuel West,—— gave us twenty-eight dollars to help defray our travelling expenses. We also received acts of kindness from others which will never be forgotten.
About this time our minds were seized with an awful foreboding— horror seemed to have laid his grasp upon us— we lay awake night after night, for we could not sleep. Our forebodings increased, and we felt sure that all was not right; yet we continued preaching, until the Lord showed us that the Saints would be driven from . We then started home, and, on arriving at Wyatt’s Mills, we were told, that if we preached there it would cost us our lives. We had given out an appointment at the house of Mrs Foster, a wealthy widow. She also advised us to give it up; but, as she had no fears for herself, her property, or family, we concluded to fulfil our appointment. The hour of meeting came, and many attended. preached about an hour; during which time Captain Fitch came in at the head of twelve other mobbers, who had large hickory clubs, and they sat down with their hats on. When took his seat, I arose and addressed them for an hour and a half, during which time, I told them that I was a patriot— that I was free— that I loved my country— that I loved liberty— that I despised both mobs and mobbers— that no gentleman, or Christian at heart, would ever be guilty of such things, or countenance them. Whereupon the mob pulled off their hats, laid down their clubs, and listened with almost breathless attention.
After meeting, Mr. Fitch came to us and said that he was ashamed of his conduct, and would never do the like again; that he had been misinformed about us by some religious [p. 15]
1841 Augt. 7 in ;—— we preached in a small branch of the Church in Calloway Co. and staid at the house of Sister Selah Parker, which was surrounded in the night by about twenty armed men, led by John Mc.Cartney a Campbellite Priest, who had sworn to kill the first Mormon Elder who should dare to preach in that place. The family were very much terrified. After trying the doors, the mobbers finally went away. We visited a number of small branches in Tennessee; the brethren generally arranged to be on hand with their money, or lands for exchange in the spring. Bror. Samuel West,—— gave us twenty-eight dollars to help defray our travelling expenses. We also received acts of kindness from others which will never be forgotten.
About this time our minds were seized with an awful foreboding— horror seemed to have laid his grasp upon us— we lay awake night after night, for we could not sleep. Our forebodings increased, and we felt sure that all was not right; yet we continued preaching, until the Lord showed us that the Saints would be driven from . We then started home, and, on arriving at Wyatt’s Mills, we were told, that if we preached there it would cost us our lives. We had given out an appointment at the house of Mrs Foster, a wealthy widow. She also advised us to give it up; but, as she had no fears for herself, her property, or family, we concluded to fulfil our appointment. The hour of meeting came, and many attended. preached about an hour; during which time Captain Fitch came in at the head of twelve other mobbers, who had large hickory clubs, and they sat down with their hats on. When took his seat, I arose and addressed them for an hour and a half, during which time, I told them that I was a patriot— that I was free— that I loved my country— that I loved liberty— that I despised both mobs and mobbers— that no gentleman, or Christian at heart, would ever be guilty of such things, or countenance them. Whereupon the mob pulled off their hats, laid down their clubs, and listened with almost breathless attention.
After meeting, Mr. Fitch came to us and said that he was ashamed of his conduct, and would never do the like again; that he had been misinformed about us by some religious [p. 15]
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