History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 Addenda

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 70
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<​1842 June 15​> here, Elijah?”
The Lord cannot always be known by the thunder of his voice; by the display of his glory, or by the manifestation of his power; and those that are the most anxious to see these things, are the least prepared to meet them, and were the Lord to manifest his power as he did to the children of Israel, such characters would be the first to say “let not the Lord speak any more, lest we his people die.”
We would say to the brethren, seek to know God in your closets, call upon him in the fields; follow the directions of the Book of Mormon, and pray over, and for, your families, your cattle, your flocks, your herds, your corn, and all things that you possess; ask the blessing of God upon all your labors, and every thing that you engage in; be virtuous, and pure, be men of integrity and truth, keep the commandments of God, and then you will be able more perfectly to understand the difference between right and wrong, between the things of God, and the things of men; and your path will be like that of the just, “which shineth brighter and brighter, unto the perfect day.” Be not so curious about tongues, do not speak in tongues except there be an interpreter present; the ultimate design of tongues is to speak to foreigners, and if persons are very anxious to display their intelligence, let them speak to such in their own tongues. The gifts of God are all useful in their place, but when they are applied to that which God does not intend, they prove an injury, a snare and a curse instead of a blessing. We may at some future time, enter more fully into this subject; but shall let this suffice for the present.”
Addenda • 30 June 1842
<​June 30​>
27th May 1842
<​page 1352​> Rev Joseph Smith,
Dear Sir,— Yours notifying me of your application for the benefit of the bankrupt act is at hand— I regret very much the step you have taken as I am fearful it will have a most disastrous influence upon your society, both commercially and religiously— You have however probably weighed the subject with sufficient care to arrive at a correct decision— You will oblige me by stating immediately on the receipt of this letter, your precise meaning in saying that “all your creditors would fare alike”— It is, as you will see, important for me to know the course taken with my notes, and also the position in which we stand to each other— You have my [p. 70]
1842 June 15 here, Elijah?”
The Lord cannot always be known by the thunder of his voice; by the display of his glory, or by the manifestation of his power; and those that are the most anxious to see these things, are the least prepared to meet them, and were the Lord to manifest his power as he did to the children of Israel, such characters would be the first to say “let not the Lord speak any more, lest we his people die.”
We would say to the brethren, seek to know God in your closets, call upon him in the fields; follow the directions of the Book of Mormon, and pray over, and for, your families, your cattle, your flocks, your herds, your corn, and all things that you possess; ask the blessing of God upon all your labors, and every thing that you engage in; be virtuous, and pure, be men of integrity and truth, keep the commandments of God, and then you will be able more perfectly to understand the difference between right and wrong, between the things of God, and the things of men; and your path will be like that of the just, “which shineth brighter and brighter, unto the perfect day.” Be not so curious about tongues, do not speak in tongues except there be an interpreter present; the ultimate design of tongues is to speak to foreigners, and if persons are very anxious to display their intelligence, let them speak to such in their own tongues. The gifts of God are all useful in their place, but when they are applied to that which God does not intend, they prove an injury, a snare and a curse instead of a blessing. We may at some future time, enter more fully into this subject; but shall let this suffice for the present.”
Addenda • 30 June 1842
June 30
27th May 1842
page 1352 Rev Joseph Smith,
Dear Sir,— Yours notifying me of your application for the benefit of the bankrupt act is at hand— I regret very much the step you have taken as I am fearful it will have a most disastrous influence upon your society, both commercially and religiously— You have however probably weighed the subject with sufficient care to arrive at a correct decision— You will oblige me by stating immediately on the receipt of this letter, your precise meaning in saying that “all your creditors would fare alike”— It is, as you will see, important for me to know the course taken with my notes, and also the position in which we stand to each other— You have my [p. 70]
Page 70