History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 Addenda

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 31
image
that entered my mind was no <​we​> shall not be lost. I immediately leaped out of my berth and went on to the upper deck I saw we were in imminent danger of being wrecked the bow of the boat was heavily laden and frequently engulphed by the heavy waves that washed over her there were judged to be 50 tons of water at a time upon her bow, at one time her bow ran under water and some thought she would never rise; the water set the mules and all the live stock afloat washed away the partition and the mules, pigs, chickens ducks and geese were all hurled in one mass down into the steerage cabin mixed pall mall with 60 Irish passengers, men women and children at that moment the roaring of the Wind the rush of the waters, the peals of thunder, the flash of Lightning, the braying of Asses, the squeeling of Pigs, the quacking of Ducks Geese and chickens, the praying, swearing and screaming of men women and children created a compound sound which rent the air and sent a gloomy thrill through the heart. We immediately went to work & helped all the passengers out of the water and from among the beasts upon the deck so their lives were preserved while all the fowls, pigs, and part of the mules were drowned or killed, many tons of water rushed through the boat until the water stood nearly to the boilers it drove the firemen from their places about this time when the boat was laboring against wind and tide, one of the wheel chains broke and the boat rolled over on to one side I again heard the cry that all was lost but about 30 of us caught hold of the two detached pieces of chain and held them together until the Engineer mended them with wire it took three strong men to manage the wheel while the boat lay upon her side it washed away a part of the State rooms orders were given to clear the boat of everything moveable all the wood was fastened with Stanchions, on the side that was down the stanchions were knocked out by the passengers and 40 cords of wood tumbled into the sea at one serge, this caused the boat to right up and we expected every moment our state room would be washed away. I left it 3 times with my wife and child and stepped upon the main deck expecting to see it washed away and to add to the horror of the scene we were wrapped in darkness as all the lanterns were dashed to pieces [p. 31]
that entered my mind was no we shall not be lost. I immediately leaped out of my berth and went on to the upper deck I saw we were in imminent danger of being wrecked the bow of the boat was heavily laden and frequently engulphed by the heavy waves that washed over her there were judged to be 50 tons of water at a time upon her bow, at one time her bow ran under water and some thought she would never rise; the water set the mules and all the live stock afloat washed away the partition and the mules, pigs, chickens ducks and geese were all hurled in one mass down into the steerage cabin mixed pall mall with 60 Irish passengers, men women and children at that moment the roaring of the Wind the rush of the waters, the peals of thunder, the flash of Lightning, the braying of Asses, the squeeling of Pigs, the quacking of Ducks Geese and chickens, the praying, swearing and screaming of men women and children created a compound sound which rent the air and sent a gloomy thrill through the heart. We immediately went to work & helped all the passengers out of the water and from among the beasts upon the deck so their lives were preserved while all the fowls, pigs, and part of the mules were drowned or killed, many tons of water rushed through the boat until the water stood nearly to the boilers it drove the firemen from their places about this time when the boat was laboring against wind and tide, one of the wheel chains broke and the boat rolled over on to one side I again heard the cry that all was lost but about 30 of us caught hold of the two detached pieces of chain and held them together until the Engineer mended them with wire it took three strong men to manage the wheel while the boat lay upon her side it washed away a part of the State rooms orders were given to clear the boat of everything moveable all the wood was fastened with Stanchions, on the side that was down the stanchions were knocked out by the passengers and 40 cords of wood tumbled into the sea at one serge, this caused the boat to right up and we expected every moment our state room would be washed away. I left it 3 times with my wife and child and stepped upon the main deck expecting to see it washed away and to add to the horror of the scene we were wrapped in darkness as all the lanterns were dashed to pieces [p. 31]
Page 31