History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 Addenda

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 68
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<​1842 June 15​> unto every man to profit withall. For to one is given, by the spirit, the word of wisdom; to another the word of knowledge, by the same spirit; to another faith by the same spirit; to another the gifts of healing, by the same spirit; to another the working of miracles; to another prophecy to another discerning of spirits; to another divers kinds of tongues; to another the interpretation of tongues. But all these worketh that one and the self same spirit, dividing to each man severally as he will. “There are several gifts mentioned here, yet which of them all could be known, by an observer, at the imposition of hands? The word of wisdom, and the word of knowledge, are as much gifts as any other, yet if a person possessed both of these gifts, or received them by the imposition of hands, who would know it? Another might receive the gift of faith, and they would be as ignorant of it. Or suppose a man had <​the​> gift of healing, or power to work miracles, that would not then be known; it would require time and circumstances to call these gifts into operation. Suppose a man had the discerning of spirits, who would be the wiser for it? Or if he had the interpretation of tongues, unless some one spoke in an unknown tongue, he of course would have to be silent; there are only two gifts that could be made visible— the gift of tongues and the gift of prophecy. These are things that are <​the​> most talked about, and yet if a person spoke in an unknown tongue, according to Paul’s testimony, he would be a barbarian to those present. They would say that it was gibberish; and if he prophesied they would call it nonsense. The gift of tongues is the smallest gift perhaps of the whole, and yet it is— one that is the most sought after. So that according to the testimony of scripture and the manifestations of the spirit in ancient days, very little could be known about it by the surrounding multitude; except on some extraordinary occasion as on the day of Pentecost. The greatest, the best, and the most useful gifts would be known nothing about by an observer. It is true that a man might prophecy which is a great gift; and one that Paul told the people— the church— to seek after and <​to​> covet, rather than to speak in tongues; but what does the world know about prophecying? Paul says that it “serveth only to those that believe.”— But does not the scriptures say that they spake in tongues and prophecied? Yes; but who is it that writes these scriptures? Not the men of the world or mere casual observers, but the Apostles— men who knew one gift from another, and [p. 68]
1842 June 15 unto every man to profit withall. For to one is given, by the spirit, the word of wisdom; to another the word of knowledge, by the same spirit; to another faith by the same spirit; to another the gifts of healing, by the same spirit; to another the working of miracles; to another prophecy to another discerning of spirits; to another divers kinds of tongues; to another the interpretation of tongues. But all these worketh that one and the self same spirit, dividing to each man severally as he will. “There are several gifts mentioned here, yet which of them all could be known, by an observer, at the imposition of hands? The word of wisdom, and the word of knowledge, are as much gifts as any other, yet if a person possessed both of these gifts, or received them by the imposition of hands, who would know it? Another might receive the gift of faith, and they would be as ignorant of it. Or suppose a man had the gift of healing, or power to work miracles, that would not then be known; it would require time and circumstances to call these gifts into operation. Suppose a man had the discerning of spirits, who would be the wiser for it? Or if he had the interpretation of tongues, unless some one spoke in an unknown tongue, he of course would have to be silent; there are only two gifts that could be made visible— the gift of tongues and the gift of prophecy. These are things that are the most talked about, and yet if a person spoke in an unknown tongue, according to Paul’s testimony, he would be a barbarian to those present. They would say that it was gibberish; and if he prophesied they would call it nonsense. The gift of tongues is the smallest gift perhaps of the whole, and yet it is— one that is the most sought after. So that according to the testimony of scripture and the manifestations of the spirit in ancient days, very little could be known about it by the surrounding multitude; except on some extraordinary occasion as on the day of Pentecost. The greatest, the best, and the most useful gifts would be known nothing about by an observer. It is true that a man might prophecy which is a great gift; and one that Paul told the people— the church— to seek after and to covet, rather than to speak in tongues; but what does the world know about prophecying? Paul says that it “serveth only to those that believe.”— But does not the scriptures say that they spake in tongues and prophecied? Yes; but who is it that writes these scriptures? Not the men of the world or mere casual observers, but the Apostles— men who knew one gift from another, and [p. 68]
Page 68