Journal, December 1841–December 1842

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 173
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If you should conclude to go away for a while I must see you before you go. And for the present I will bid you be chearful and make yourself as happy as you can for the right side of the wheel will soon be up again. And till then and ever I remain under every circumstance your friend &
Obt servant .
On the same day that the foregoing letter was wrote to . President Joseph wrote one to in the words following To Wit;
August 16th. 1842
My Dear
I embrace this opportunity to express to you some of my feelings this morning. First of all, I take the liberty to tender you my sincere thanks for the two interesting and consoling visits that you have made me during my almost exiled situation. Tongue can not express the gratitude of my heart, for the warm and true-hearted friendship you have manifested in these things toward me. The time has passed away since you left me, very agreeably; thus far, my mind being perfectly reconciled to my fate, let it be what it may. I have been kept from melancholy and dumps, by the kind-heartedness of , and his interesting chit-chat from time to time, which has called my mind from the more strong contemplations of things, and subjects that would have preyed more earnestly upon my feelings. Last night—in the night—, , & others came to see us. They seemed much agitated, and expressed some fears in consequence of some manouverings and some flying reports which they had heard in relation to our safety; but after relating what it was, I was able to comprehend the whole matter to my entire satisfaction, and did not feel at all alarmed or uneasy. They think, however, that the Militia will be called out to search the city, and if this should be the case I would be much safer for the time being at a little distance off, untill could get weary and be made ashamed of his corrupt and unhallowed pro-ceedings. I had supposed, however, that if there were any serious operations taking by the ; that or would have notified us; and cannot believe that any thing very serious is to be apprehended, untill we obtain information from a source that can be relied on. I have consulted wether it is best for you to go to , and see the ; but on the whole, he is a fool; and the impressions that are suggested to my mind, are, that it will be of no use; and the more we notice him, and flatter him, the more eager he will be for our destruction. You may write to him, whatever you see proper, but to go and see him, I do not give my consent at present. Brother Miller again suggested to me the propriety of my accompanying him to the , and then he return, and bring you [p. 173]
If you should conclude to go away for a while I must see you before you go. And for the present I will bid you be chearful and make yourself as happy as you can for the right side of the wheel will soon be up again. And till then and ever I remain under every circumstance your friend &
Obt servant .
On the same day that the foregoing letter was wrote to . President Joseph wrote one to in the words following To Wit;
August 16th. 1842
My Dear
I embrace this opportunity to express to you some of my feelings this morning. First of all, I take the liberty to tender you my sincere thanks for the two interesting and consoling visits that you have made me during my almost exiled situation. Tongue can not express the gratitude of my heart, for the warm and true-hearted friendship you have manifested in these things toward me. The time has passed away since you left me, very agreeably; thus far, my mind being perfectly reconciled to my fate, let it be what it may. I have been kept from melancholy and dumps, by the kind-heartedness of , and his interesting chit-chat from time to time, which has called my mind from the more strong contemplations of things, and subjects that would have preyed more earnestly upon my feelings. Last night—in the night—, , & others came to see us. They seemed much agitated, and expressed some fears in consequence of some manouverings and some flying reports which they had heard in relation to our safety; but after relating what it was, I was able to comprehend the whole matter to my entire satisfaction, and did not feel at all alarmed or uneasy. They think, however, that the Militia will be called out to search the city, and if this should be the case I would be much safer for the time being at a little distance off, untill could get weary and be made ashamed of his corrupt and unhallowed pro-ceedings. I had supposed, however, that if there were any serious operations taking by the ; that or would have notified us; and cannot believe that any thing very serious is to be apprehended, untill we obtain information from a source that can be relied on. I have consulted wether it is best for you to go to , and see the ; but on the whole, he is a fool; and the impressions that are suggested to my mind, are, that it will be of no use; and the more we notice him, and flatter him, the more eager he will be for our destruction. You may write to him, whatever you see proper, but to go and see him, I do not give my consent at present. Brother Miller again suggested to me the propriety of my accompanying him to the , and then he return, and bring you [p. 173]
Page 173